Germany’s Luftwaffe Airbus A400M transport aircraft

German Air Force Refuses to Take Delivery of Two Airbus A400M

The German Air Force (Luftwaffe) said on Wednesday it had decided not to accept delivery of two European plane-building consortium’s A400M military transporters planes, citing recurring technical problems with the military transporters. They said extra inspections were also needed to test engine mounts, combustion chambers and engine flaps and for crack detection on various parts. European plane-building consortium’s A400M military transporters. It said the A400M was still not able to perform all tasks, despite these checks.

On 5 November 2010, Belgium, Britain, France, Germany, Luxembourg, Spain and Turkey finalised the contract and agreed to lend Airbus Military €1.5 billion. The UK reduced its order from 25 to 22 aircraft and Germany from 60 to 53, decreasing the total order from 180 to 170. The air force said the A400M had taken part in nearly 1,700 missions and formed the backbone of its air transport for carrying personnel and material, air-to-air refueling and humanitarian aid missions. Although 31 aircraft of 53 ordered had been handed over, it said there were technical issues with the planes, including with nuts used on propellers. It said extra time was needed for inspections that undermined the readiness of the A400M fleet.

Airbus said in a statement that issues with the model were not safety critical. “We are aware of findings related to dowel bolts / propeller interface in some of our customer aircraft,” it said. “This is not safety critical and our customers continue to accept and operate their aircraft.” It said it was working both with Europrop International (EPI), the consortium responsible for providing the troop carrier’s turboprop engines, and Ratier-Figeac, the French company that makes the propellers, to alleviate the need for inspections.

Germany’s Luftwaffe Airbus A400M transport aircraft

Germany’s Luftwaffe Airbus A400M transport aircraft

Advertisements
Australian Department of Defense Signs Multi-Million Dollar Contract for Air Defence Radars

Australian Department of Defense Signs Multi-Million Dollar Contract for Air Defence Radars

Australian Department of Defense has signed a multi-million dollar contract with leading-edge Canberra company CEA Technologies Pty Ltd, for the supply of Army’s new short range ground-based air defence capability. The $137 million contract will provide advanced radars as part of the air defence system to protect Australia deployed forces from sophisticated air threats. The vehicle-mounted radars will be delivered in long and short range variants, with the short range variant to be mounted on the Australian-developed Thales Hawkei vehicle.

Australian Department of Defense Signs Multi-Million Dollar Contract for Air Defence Radars

Australian Department of Defense Signs Multi-Million Dollar Contract for Air Defence Radars


Minister for Defence, Senator the Hon Linda Reynolds CSC said the Morrison Government is committed to providing the Australian Defence Force with the best capability to defend Australia’s national interests. “This air defence capability combines world leading Australian radar technology with a highly effective air defence system that will protect our service men and women from future airborne threats,” Minister Reynolds said. “I congratulate CEA for adapting these radars from those already in service with the Royal Australian Navy, confirming its reputation as an agile, innovative company and a key strategic partner for Defence.”
Australian Department of Defense Signs Multi-Million Dollar Contract for Air Defence Radars

Australian Department of Defense Signs Multi-Million Dollar Contract for Air Defence Radars


Minister for Defence Industry, the Hon Melissa Price MP said CEA was already a recognised success story for Australian industry. “Integration of these radars into existing air defence technology is a significant step in establishing Australian industry as a leading exporter of defence technology,” Minister Price said. “This contract with CEA will support 45 jobs in Canberra and Adelaide and demonstrates the company’s ongoing success after securing a $90 million loan through the Morrison Government’s Defence Export Facility.”

French Test Jaguar Armored Vehicles for Amphibious Qualification Testing

French Test Griffon and Jaguar Armored Vehicles for Amphibious Qualification Testing

Earlier this November month, the Griffon and the Jaguar were submitted to embarkation and disembarkation tests carried on with a Landing Craft Utility (CTM/Chaland de Transport de Matériel) and Landing Craft Utilities catamaran (EDAR/Engin de Débarquement Amphibie) of the French navy. The goal of these operational tests is to make sure these vehicles can embark on and disembark from the amphibious means currently used by the French navy. The ageing CTMs will be replaced by the new EDA-S starting in mid-2020.

French Test Griffon and Jaguar Armored Vehicles for Amphibious Qualification Testing

French Test Griffon and Jaguar Armored Vehicles for Amphibious Qualification Testing


The ongoing Jaguar and Griffon qualification tests program is conducted in collaboration between the French Armament General Directorate (DGA), the Technical Section of the French Army (STAT) and the industrial contractors: Nexter, Thales and Arquus. The tests cleared those doubts. The excellent mobility of both vehicle types enables them to land on an unprepared beach and immediately start their combat mission. The tests were progressive, starting from a concrete ramp, then from a wharf, and finally, embarkation from and landing on an unprepared beach with the support of engineer wheeled vehicles.
French Test Griffon Armored Vehicles for Amphibious Qualification Testing

French Test Griffon Armored Vehicles for Amphibious Qualification Testing


The VBMR Griffon (Véhicule Blindé Multi-Rôles) is a French 6×6 Multi-Role armored vehicle that will replace the French Army’s VAB armored personnel carrier. The Griffon is equipped with a remote weapons station that can be armed with either a 12.7mm or 7.62mm machine gun, or a 40mm automatic grenade launcher. The addition of two Missile Moyenne Portée (MMP) anti-tank guided missiles is optional. Eight launchers for smoke grenades are fitted to the remote weapon station, which also includes an acoustic sniper localisation system. The vehicle has also been bought by the Belgian army.
French Test Jaguar Armored Vehicles for Amphibious Qualification Testing

French Test Jaguar Armored Vehicles for Amphibious Qualification Testing


The EBRC Jaguar (Engin Blindé de Reconnaissance et de Comba) is a French armored reconnaissance and combat vehicle that will replace the French Army’s VCAC, AMX 10 RC and ERC 90 Sagaie reconnaissance and fire support vehicles. The vehicle is built with STANAG 4569 Level 4 armor protection, giving it defense against 14.5×114mm armor-piercing rounds, 155mm artillery shell splinters, and 10 kg (22 lb) mine blasts. The Jaguar’s primary weapon, mounted in a two-man turret, is the CTA International CT40 cannon firing 40mm case telescoped ammunition with a rate of fire of 200 rounds per minute and a maximum range of 1,500 meters.

Student Pilots’ First Time Soaring In F-35 Through Allied F-35 B-Course

Student Pilots’ First Time Soaring In F-35 Through Allied F-35 B-Course

In a span of eight demanding months, four 62nd Fighter Squadron student pilots – two U.S. and two Norwegian – will learn the ins-and-outs of the F-35A Lightning II as they train through the first-ever allied F-35 B-course, beginning as novices and developing into proficient and lethal fighter pilots. The 62nd FS activated in January 2015 at Luke Air Force Base as a joint international effort between Italy, Norway and the United States for F-35 training. Student pilots from each of the three nations fly Italian, Norwegian and American F-35s under the guidance of American and Norwegian instructor pilots.

“This is the first allied Basic course ever in the F-35,” said Lt. Col. Christopher Hubbard, 62nd FS squadron commander. “Previously, only U.S. pilots learned to fly the F-35 as their first fighter jet straight out of pilot training. Now, for the first time ever, Norwegian pilots are training right alongside American pilots in the F-35 B-course.” The student pilots took their first flights in the fifth generation fighter on varying dates in September and October, familiarizing themselves with the F-35 and its components.

U.S. Air Force Capt. Roland Neal, 62nd Fighter Squadron fighter pilot student, prepares for his first flight in the F-35A Lightning II Oct. 1, 2019, at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz.

U.S. Air Force Capt. Roland Neal, 62nd Fighter Squadron fighter pilot student, prepares for his first flight in the F-35A Lightning II Oct. 1, 2019, at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz.


“The first flight was awesome,” said U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Nathanael Zilllweger, 62nd FS fighter student pilot. “It’s interesting because in the simulator you can’t feel the jet at all. On your first flight the jet rumbles a little bit so you get a feel for what it’s like to have 40,000 pounds of thrust at your back. That was probably the best thing for me.” The students employed their training as they taxied onto the runway and rose into the air, experiencing the power of the F-35 for the first time.

“It was a great experience,” said a Royal Norwegian air force fighter student pilot assigned to the 62nd FS. “When you do the first takeoff after only flying aircraft in previous flights with smaller engines, you can really feel the kick of the aircraft accelerating on the runway. It was really fun to achieve the goal of flying a fighter jet for the first time.” The student pilots train on smaller aircraft prior to starting the F-35 B-course to learn the basics of military flight operations.

Four student pilots, two U.S and two Norwegian, are attending the eight-month first-ever allied F-35 B-course, preparing for Red Flag at Nellis AFB, Nev.

Four student pilots, two U.S and two Norwegian, are attending the eight-month first-ever allied F-35 B-course, preparing for Red Flag at Nellis AFB, Nev.


While attending Undergraduate Pilot Training (UPT), student pilots fly the T-6 Texan II which is a two-seat, single propeller trainer. Next, they’ll fly the T-38 Talon, which is a two-seat twin-engine jet trainer, said Capt. Sake, 62nd FS Norwegian flight commander and instructor pilot. Flying instrument information on the T-6 and the T-38 lay the foundation for success, preparing the student pilots to tackle the F-35’s components. The F-35 B-course provides an in-depth orientation to the fifth-generation fighter.

The first phase of the F-35 B-course, or basic flight class, is a month of classroom basics to identify how each system in the Lightning II works. The second phase is ground simulator training, performing hours of local and emergency procedures, along with other simulations. The last phase includes hands-on training, and the students are paired into operational squadrons where instructor pilots teach academics and the students fly the F-35 for the first time, said Sake.

Red Flag is an annual exercise in which student pilots experience realistic combat simulations.

Red Flag is an annual exercise in which student pilots experience realistic combat simulations.


“In some ways, the T-38 is actually a little bit more challenging to maneuver just because the flight controls are very mechanical, whereas the F-35’s are more electrical,” said a Royal Norwegian air force student pilot. “The F-35 handles a little bit easier even though it has more power and thrust.”

In March 2020, the student pilots are scheduled to attend Red Flag at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. Red Flag is an annual exercise in which student pilots experience realistic combat simulations. As a multi-national exercise, the students will practice flying with different countries, allowing them to build on their skills, said Sake.

The 62nd FS activated in January 2015 at Luke Air Force Base as a joint international effort between Italy, Norway and the United States for F-35 training.

The 62nd FS activated in January 2015 at Luke Air Force Base as a joint international effort between Italy, Norway and the United States for F-35 training.


“Red Flag is the long-term big goal that I’m looking forward to,” said a Royal Norwegian air force fighter student pilot. “I think we need to take in everything that happens along the way because that’s going to be the building blocks that’s going to lead us there. Everything we’re doing from this point on is things we’ve never seen before, at this scale at least. Everything is interesting and fun.” The U.S. and Norwegian instructors have high expectations for their four student pilots.

“They’ve been very strong up to this point,” said Sake. “We expect them to continue that strong trend, to be prepared and ready to stand up on their own.” The Norwegian and U.S. student pilots that are training together are making history and strengthening foreign partner relationships. “This is a huge milestone for the 62nd FS, 56th Fighter Wing, U.S. Air Force, and Royal Norwegian Air Force,” said Hubbard. “This interoperability means that all F-35 partners are, or will be, training on the same airplane, using the same syllabus, operating off the same tactics manual and going through the same training pipeline. The benefits to this commonality are just starting to be seen, but will undoubtedly give allied combat efforts a huge advantage in future conflicts.”

Student Pilots’ First Time Soaring In F-35 Through Allied F-35 B-Course

Student Pilots’ First Time Soaring In F-35 Through Allied F-35 B-Course

Starting Local Production of PIRANHA 5 in Romania

Starting Local Production of PIRANHA 5 in Romania

General Dynamics European Land Systems (GDELS) has started on November 6th the production of PIRANHA 5 vehicles at the factory of its strategic Romanian partner Uzina Mecanică București (UMB) which marks an important milestone in the PIRANHA 5 Program for the Romanian Army. The production start ceremony was attended by the Prime Minister of Romania, Ludovic Orban, the Minister of Defence, General (ret.) Nicolae Ciuca, and the Ministry of Economy, Energy, Business Environment and Tourism, Virgil Popescu, as well as the US Ambassador to Romania, Hans Klemm, and Swiss Ambassador to Romania, Arthur Mattli.

In January 2018, and as part of the Romanian Army’s plan to modernize its legacy wheeled armored vehicle fleet, GDELS signed a contract with the Romanian Army to deliver up to 227 PIRANHA 5 wheeled armored vehicles in six different configurations. The modern PIRANHA 5 vehicles will be produced in Romania under a strategic cooperation and transfer of technology project between GDELS – Mowag and the Romanian company Uzina Mecanică București (UMB).

Starting Local Production of PIRANHA 5 in Romania

Starting Local Production of PIRANHA 5 in Romania


“The strategic cooperation between GDELS and the UMB is an excellent example on how we plan to modernize our Armed Forces with modern technology. It also represents a great opportunity for our Romanian economy to strengthen and sustain our national industry base in this important segment including export opportunities. I am proud to say, that 80% of the investment we take in this project will return to the benefit of our local economy.” stated Prime Minister of Romania, Mr. Ludovic Orban.

”We are deeply honoured and grateful that Prime Minister Orban, Minister of Economy Popescu and Minister of National Defense General ret. Ciuca have attended our opening ceremony today and I would like to emphasize the strong and clear commitment of GDELS to become the strategic land systems supplier for the Romanian Army.

Starting Local Production of PIRANHA 5 in Romania

Starting Local Production of PIRANHA 5 in Romania


The opening of the local production line at UMB marks a first major step in establishing our sustainable collaboration with trusted Romanian partners” said Dr. Thomas Kauffmann, GDELS Vice President. “The vast transfer of technology and the local production of the PIRANHA 5 also represents an enormous opportunity to the Romanian industry for the future.”

“Romania has proven once again that it has the capacity to produce in country high end military products. The UMB facility has been modernized and brought to international standards thanks to this contract and is now a modern production facility for a key project of our military procurement programs. The collaboration with GDELS will bring UMB in a leading position among our Romanian military industry”, said Mihai Rafiu, General Director UMB.

Starting Local Production of PIRANHA 5 in Romania

Starting Local Production of PIRANHA 5 in Romania

Antonov An-178 medium transport aircraft

Ukroboronprom to Supply An-178 to Peru

SFTE “SpetsTechnoExport”, part of the State Concern “Ukroboronprom”, has completed the procedure of signing a contract with the Ministry of Interior of the Republic of Peru for supply of An-178 medium transport aircraft. Terms of the contract provide the production and delivery of the Ukrainian aircraft for the needs of the National Police of Peru, provision of training, aftersales service and extended warranties. The tender offer of SpetsTechnoExport was the best, outperforming the final competitors, including C27J from Leonardo (USA-Italy) and CASA C-295 from Airbus (Spain).

Antonov An-178 medium transport aircraft

Antonov An-178 medium transport aircraft


To determine the final assessment, the customer took into account the performance specifications of the aircraft, delivery time, extended warranties, personnel training etc. With the signing of the contract, Ukraine opens the Latin American market for a new generation of Antonov transport aircrafts. SpetsTechnoExport is currently negotiating with potential customers of Ukrainian aircrafts from other countries in the region.
Antonov An-178 medium transport aircraft

Antonov An-178 medium transport aircraft


The medium transport aircraft An-178 was developed by the “ANTONOV” company which is a part of Ukroboronprom. An-178 is a further development of the family of regional jets An-148 and An-158 that have been certified internationally. Maximum cruising altitude of An-178 is 12.2 km, flight range is 5500 km, the maximum cruising speed is 825 km/h. The aircraft has a unique form of fuselage and ability to carry different types of cargo. An-178 can be operated from/to both unpaved runways and those with artificial pavement
Antonov An-178 medium transport aircraft

Antonov An-178 medium transport aircraft


The An-178 made its flight in May 2015. Since then, set of measures for import substitution of aircraft’s components have been taken. As part of the An-178 worldwide presentation, the aircraft has already been at airfields of the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Turkey, Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates.

Diehl Defence Signs Contract for Norwegian Mobile Ground Based Air Defence

Diehl Defence Signs Contract for Norwegian Mobile Ground Based Air Defence

Diehl Defence participates in the development and production of a new Mobile Ground Based Air Defence system, which will be delivered to the Norwegian Army. Prime contractor of this program is Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace AS. The system will employ Diehl Defence’s IRIS-T air-to-air missiles, which are already in service with the Norwegian Air Force. Similar to the IRIS-T SLS air defence system, which is just brought into service in the Swedish Army, the IRIS-T missile can be used both in air-launched and ground-launched applications.

The missiles will be launched from an advanced IRIS-T SLS missile launcher based on key components from Diehl Defence. Additionally, Diehl Defence will support Kongsberg in the integration of the IRIS-T SLS in the overall system architecture. Norway is now the second country after Sweden, which employs IRIS-T SLS to safeguard its airspace. The new system will provide a unique capability to protect the Norwegian forces during their maneuver operations.

IRIS-T SLS short-range air-defence system

IRIS-T SLS short-range air-defence system


Air defence systems are used to protect the population, important buildings, objects as well as ground troops against attacks from the air. Particularly ground-based air defence is capable of providing continuous area protection over the long term. For the Bundeswehr´s Tactical Air Defence System (TLVS), Diehl Defence developed the surface-launched IRIS-T SL, an upgraded version of the IRIS-T missile equipping fighter aircraft of numerous countries worldwide.

In combination with various radar and command systems, IRIS-T SL offers the capabilities and benefits of an advanced air defence system. An entire IRIS-T SLM system was tested successfully for the first time in 2014 in the presence of international representatives. Presently Diehl is equipping the Swedish Army with the IRIS-T SLS short-range air-defence system. The SHORAD solution employs the IRIS-T air-to-air missile, operative in Sweden, for vertical launch from the Hägglunds Bv410 carrier platform.

Diehl Defence Signs Contract for Norwegian Mobile Ground Based Air Defence

Diehl Defence Signs Contract for Norwegian Mobile Ground Based Air Defence