Category Archives: Naval Warfare

CH-53E Super Stallion Successfully Recovers AH-1Z Viper

CH-53E Super Stallion Successfully Recovers AH-1Z Viper

A CH-53E Super Stallion aircraft with Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 465, a UH-1Y Venom aircraft with Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 267 and Marines from the 3rd Marine Logistics Group execute a Tactical Recovery of Aircraft and Personnel Mission, recovering an AH-1Z Viper helicopter from W-174 Joint Okinawa Training Range Complex on Feb. 11, 2019. The complex is located on Idesuna Jima, an uninhabited island off the coast of Okinawa, Japan.

CH-53E Super Stallion Successfully Recovers AH-1Z Viper

CH-53E Super Stallion Successfully Recovers AH-1Z Viper


TRAP, a unique capability of the Marine Corps CH-53E Super Stallion, demonstrates 1st Marine Aircraft Wing’s ability to provide a relevant, robust, and flexible capability when conducting personnel and aircraft recovery. A Marine Corps mission performed by an assigned and briefed aircrew for the specific purpose of the recovery of personnel, equipment, and/or aircraft when the tactical situation precludes search and rescue assets from responding and when survivors and their location have been confirmed.
CH-53E Super Stallion Successfully Recovers AH-1Z Viper

CH-53E Super Stallion Successfully Recovers AH-1Z Viper


Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 465 (HMH-465) is a United States Marine Corps helicopter squadron consisting of CH-53E Super Stallion transport helicopters. The squadron, known as “Warhorse”, is based at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, California and falls under the command of Marine Aircraft Group 16 (MAG-16) and the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing (3rd MAW).

(U.S. Marine Corps video by Cpl. Alexia Lythos and Cpl. Dakota Heathwarr)
Interviews in order of appearance: Capt. Valerie Smith, CH-53E pilot, Sgt. Joseph Desmond, CH-53E crew chief and Capt. Sean Charvet, CH-53E Pilot, all with HMH-465.

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Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey Marks Three Decades of Transforming Military Aviation

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey Marks Three Decades of Transforming Military Aviation

During the thirty years since the Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey first flew, the tiltrotor aircraft, built by Bell Helicopter, a Textron Inc.company, and Boeing, has fundamentally changed how the U.S. Marine Corps and Air Force operate in combat and support humanitarian operations. The V-22 has become one of the most in-demand and reliable aircraft in military service with its unique vertical maneuverability combined with the speed, range and fuel efficiency of a fixed-wing airplane. So far, more than 375 V-22 aircraft have accumulated more than 450,000 flight hours across a spectrum of missions. Soon, the U.S. Navy will begin using a new V-22 variant to deliver personnel and cargo to its aircraft carriers, becoming the latest operator leveraging the aircraft’s unique capabilities. The failure of the Iran hostage rescue mission in 1980 demonstrated to the United States military a need for “a new type of aircraft, that could not only take off and land vertically but also could carry combat troops, and do so at speed.” The U.S. Department of Defense began the Joint-service Vertical take-off/landing Experimental (JVX) aircraft program in 1981, under U.S. Army leadership.

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey


The defining mission of the Marine Corps has been to perform an amphibious landing, and they were particularly interested in the JVX program. They realized that a concentrated strike force was vulnerable to a single nuclear weapon, airborne solutions with good speed and range allowed for significant dispersal; and their CH-46s were wearing out; without replacement, the threat of a merger between the Marine Corps and the Army lingered, similar to President Truman’s proposal following World War II. The U.S. Navy and Marine Corps were given the lead in 1983. The JVX combined requirements from the U.S. Marine Corps, Air Force, Army and Navy. A request for proposals (RFP) was issued in December 1982 for preliminary design work. Interest was expressed by Aérospatiale, Bell Helicopter, Boeing Vertol, Grumman, Lockheed, and Westland. Contractors were encouraged to form teams. Bell partnered with Boeing Vertol to submit a proposal for an enlarged version of the Bell XV-15 prototype on 17 February 1983. Being the only proposal received, a preliminary design contract was awarded on 26 April 1983.
Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey


The JVX aircraft was designated V-22 Osprey on 15 January 1985; by that March, the first six prototypes were being produced, and Boeing Vertol was expanded to deal with the project workload. The first V-22 was rolled out with significant media attention in May 1988. The first of six MV-22 prototypes first flew on 19 March 1989 in the helicopter mode, and on 14 September 1989 in fixed-wing mode. This redesigned version became the V-22B model. V-22 flights resumed in June 1993 after safety improvements were incorporated in the prototypes. Bell Boeing was awarded a contract for the engineering manufacturing development (EMD) phase in June 1994. The prototypes also received changes to better match the B-model configuration. Flight testing at the stage focused on expanding the flight envelope, measuring flight loads, and supporting the EMD redesign. This and further flight testing with the early V-22s continued into 1997. Flight testing of four full-scale development V-22s began in early 1997 when the first pre-production V-22 was delivered to the Naval Air Warfare Test Center, Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland.

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey


On 28 September 2005, the Pentagon formally approved full-rate production for the V-22, with planned rate increase from 11 a year to between 24 and 48 a year by 2012. Of the 458 total planned, 360 are for the U.S. Marine Corps, 50 for the Air Force, and 48 for the Navy at an average cost of $110 million per aircraft, including development costs. The V-22 had an incremental flyaway cost of $67 million per aircraft in 2008, The U.S. Navy had hoped to shave about $10 million off that cost after a five-year production contract in 2013. The cost for each CV-22 was $73 million in the FY 2014 budget. On 12 June 2013, the U.S. DoD awarded a $4.9 billion contract to Bell and Boeing for 99 V-22s in production Lots 17 and 18, including 92 MV-22s for the Marine Corps. Work is expected to be completed in September 2019. A provision gives NAVAIR the option to order 23 more Ospreys. The combined cost of the June 2013 contract and other associated contracts for the order totaled $6.5 billion. In 2015, Bell-Boeing set up the V-22 Readiness Operations Center (VROC) at Ridley Park, Pennsylvania to gather information from each aircraft to improve fleet performance in a similar manner as the F-35’s Autonomic Logistics Information System (ALIS).

Solas Marine 16M fast interceptor boat

Solas Marine 16M fast interceptor boat

Solas Marine fast interceptor boats (FIC) are vessels being built for the Indian Navy by a shipyard located along the Hamilton Canal at Wattala, near Colombo, owned by Solas Marine Lanka (Pvt) Ltd. Solas Marine Lanka (Pvt) Ltd is part of Dubai-based Solas Marine Services Group. The Indian ministry of defence (MOD) on 22 May 2009 sent out request for proposal (RfP) to 43 shipyards in India and other countries for 80 FICs. After the bids were submitted by the contenders, they were evaluated by the technical evaluation committee (TEC). Thereafter Sri Lankan shipyard Solas Marine was shortlisted for supply of the 80 boats. A deal worth ₹3 billion (US$42 million) for the same was signed in the last week of September 2011. As per the agreement, the 80 boats were to be supplied in batches of 15 and the induction of first batch was to take place within 36 months from the signing of the contract.

Solas Marine 16M fast interceptor boat

Solas Marine 16M fast interceptor boat


The delivery of the initial batch of FICs was scheduled for December 2012 and the following batch in April 2013. This was delayed at the manufacturer’s end, pushing the delivery schedule by a few months. As of March 2013 first bath of four craft were delivered to southern command which were inducted by it on 20 March 2013 and Southern Naval Command was also scheduled to receive 12 more of these craft in the coming months.Out of 80 boats, 31 will be based in Western Naval Command, 16 in Southern Naval Command, 33 in Eastern Naval Command. They will be used by the navy’s newly raised Sagar Prahari Bal for guarding naval assets and strategic installations from seaborne threats, harbour defence (primarily, protection of vessels inside the harbour area), and patrolling the seafront with state marine police forces.
Solas Marine 16M fast interceptor boat

Solas Marine 16M fast interceptor boat


The Solas Marine interceptor boats are 16-metre (52 ft) long boats with beam of 3.8 metres (12 ft) and have draught of 0.8 metres (2 ft 7 in). They have deep–vee chine hull form with sharp water entry to ensure a soft ride in adverse sea states. The Vacuum infusion process have been used to build hull, which ensure significant strength gains, intrinsic to the technology. The vessels have excellent sea-keeping and dynamic stability capability at high speed in sea state 3 and is sea worthy up to sea state 4. The craft’s model has been tested at Wolfson, UK.
Solas Marine 16M fast interceptor boat

Solas Marine 16M fast interceptor boat


The upper deck canopy of each vessel is bullet proof and has air conditioned crew area to meet all crew comfort and safety measures. They are water-jet propelled with top speed of 45 knots (83 km/h; 52 mph) and have endurance of 200 nautical miles (370 km; 230 mi) at 12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph). They are also fitted with night vision devices, communication equipment, automatic identification system (AIS) and radar, besides carrying a Long Range Acoustic Device (LRAD), a sonic weapon used for scaring pirates away. The vessels carry a crew of 4 and can carry a variety of armament from Heavy Machine Guns to Grenade Launchers. They are intended for intercepting suspicious boats for inspection and verification.

NNS Completes Installation of USS George Washington (CVN 73) Main Mast

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ Newport News Shipbuilding division has reached new heights in the refueling and complex overhaul (RCOH) of the aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73). The shipyard installed the final piece of the ship’s new main mast—the 34-foot upper mast section—that raises the ship’s distinctive profile 123 feet above the flight deck. The RCOH now is 50 percent complete.

NNS Completes Installation of USS George Washington (CVN 73) Main Mast

NNS Completes Installation of USS George Washington (CVN 73) Main Mast


“Landing the upper mast is one of the most visible construction milestones in the mid-life refueling overhaul and maintenance availability of an aircraft carrier,” said Chris Miner, Newport News’ vice president, in-service aircraft carrier programs. “We are making significant progress with George Washington and look forward to returning a fully recapitalized, mission-ready ship to the fleet for another 25 years of service.”
NNS Completes Installation of USS George Washington (CVN 73) Main Mast

NNS Completes Installation of USS George Washington (CVN 73) Main Mast


To commemorate the milestone, George Washington sailors on Friday held a brief mast-stepping ceremony that recognizes an ancient maritime custom of placing a coin underneath the ship’s mast to bring good fortune. A time capsule containing photos, a piece of the old mast, several coins and other artifacts was attached to a metal plate, which later will be welded under the mast.
NNS Completes Installation of USS George Washington (CVN 73) Main Mast

NNS Completes Installation of USS George Washington (CVN 73) Main Mast


“Mast-stepping is a way to link the past with the future,” said Capt. Glenn Jamison, the ship’s commanding officer. “It is a way to honor the heritage of this ship and our namesake. George Washington once said that ‘without a decisive naval force we can do nothing definitive, and with it, everything honorable and glorious.’ Now, with this new mast signifying the progress we’re making during RCOH, USS George Washington is ready to carry on the mantle of representing the Navy as only General George Washington could have imagined and wanted.”
NNS Completes Installation of USS George Washington (CVN 73) Main Mast

NNS Completes Installation of USS George Washington (CVN 73) Main Mast


The ship arrived at Newport News in August 2017 to begin the complex engineering and construction project and is currently in dry dock for hull and freeboard blasting and painting; repairs to its propellers, sea chests, shafts and rudders; and defueling and refueling of its power plant.

Huntington Ingalls secures $1.47 billion deal for US Navy LPD 30

Huntington Ingalls secures $1.47 billion deal for US Navy LPD 30

Huntington Ingalls Industries announced on March 26 that its Ingalls Shipbuilding division has received a $US 1.47 billion, cost-plus-fixed-fee contract from the U.S. Navy for the detail design and construction of the amphibious transport dock Landing Platform Dock (LPD) 30. The ship will be the 14th in the San Antonio class and the first Flight II LPD. LPD 30 is the evolution of the dock landing platform that strengthens the Navy and Marine Corps’ needs in future warfare. Utilizing the LPD 17 class’ proven hull, this LPD derivative is highly adaptable and, like the first 13 ships in the class, will be used to accomplish a full range of military operations—from major combat to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. The ship’s versatility—from its well deck, flight deck and hospital facilities to its self-defense and survivability features—provides a viable platform for America’s global defense needs.

“Ingalls looks forward to continuing our strong legacy of providing the men and women of our naval forces with the capable and survivable warships they need and deserve,” said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. “The LPD Flight II builds upon the significant investment that has been made in this platform to improve the capability and flexibility of our deployed Navy-Marine Corps team. LPD 30 will leverage a hot production line and further benefit from the investments we continue to make in our shipbuilders and facilities. We are honored to be a part of the team that will provide this next-generation platform today.”

Huntington Ingalls secures $1.47 billion deal for US Navy LPD 30

Huntington Ingalls secures $1.47 billion deal for US Navy LPD 30


Ingalls has delivered 11 San Antonio-class ships to the Navy and has two more under construction. Fort Lauderdale (LPD 28) will launch in 2020 and deliver in 2021; the keel for Richard M. McCool Jr. (LPD 29) will be laid later this year. Start of fabrication on LPD 30 is scheduled for 2020. The San Antonio class is a major part of the Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long, 105-foot-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

Tactical Missiles Corporation (KTRV)

Tactical Missiles Corporation (KTRV)

JSC Tactical Missiles Corporation (Корпорация Тактическое Ракетное Вооружение) or KTRV is a major Russian weapon (especially missiles) manufacturer. Headquarters in Korolyov, Moscow Oblast. Tactical Missiles Corporation joint stock company (JSC) was established in accordance with Federal Target Program such as “Restructuring and development of Defense Industry Complex” (2002-2006 years) and Presidential Decree № 84 dated 24 January 2002. The Corporation as an integrated structure was formed on the basis of a reorganized federal state unitary enterprise “State research and production centre “Zvezda-Strela” (Korolev) in “Tactical Missiles Corporation”JSC. During such reorganization process the Corporation received shares from enterprises included in Defense Industry Complex. Establishment registration of the Corporation was finished in March 2003.

Tactical Missiles Corporation (KTRV)

Tactical Missiles Corporation (KTRV)


Tactical Missiles Corporation was founded on the basis of Zvezda-Strela by the Decree of Russian President №84, signed on January 24, 2002. Zvezda-Strela was a major designer and producer of military missile systems, and included the Zvezda Experimental Design Bureau (OKB), a serial production design bureau (SKB), the main Strela plant, and machine building plants in Kostroma and Bendery (Moldova). It was formerly part of the missile-industry grouping Spetstekhnika (Special Equipment). The structure of Tactical Missiles Corporation was expanded by subsequent decrees №591 on May 9, 2004 and №930 on July 20, 2007.
Tactical Missiles Corporation (KTRV)

Tactical Missiles Corporation (KTRV)


Austal awarded 369 million U.S. Navy contract for Expeditionary Fast Transport ships

Austal awarded 369 million U.S. Navy contract for Expeditionary Fast Transport ships

Austal Limited (Austal) has been awarded a new A$369 (US$261,776,539) million contract for two additional Expeditionary Fast Transport Ships (EPF) by the U.S. Navy. The contract award extends the EPF program to 2022, with construction of EPF 13 to commence in late 2019 and EPF 14 to follow in the middle of 2020. The contract follows the award for long-lead time materials on EPF 13 and EPF 14 that was announced in December 2018. The 14-ship, EPF program has to date been worth over US$2 billion and underscores the ability of Austal USA to build highly capable ships at an affordable cost.

Austal Expeditionary Fast Transport ships

Austal Expeditionary Fast Transport ships


“The extension of this program to 14 vessels is a result of the versatility of the EPF platform to perform an increasing range of roles for the U.S. Navy combined with the confidence our customer has in it. We continue to believe that the EPF vessel, in various configurations, has a long future ahead of it,” Austal CEO, David Singleton said. “We have a proven ability to build these cost effective vessels efficiently at our state-of-the-art manufacturing facility in Mobile, Alabama and as a result they will continue to underpin the shipyard for several years to come. We are pleased to add these new vessels to what is already a record order book, which includes the contract Austal recently received for two additional Independence Class, Littoral Combat Ships (LCS).
Austal Expeditionary Fast Transport ships

Austal Expeditionary Fast Transport ships


Austal was awarded the initial contract to design and build the first 103-meter EPF in November 2008. Since then, ten Spearhead-class EPFs have been delivered and are serving as an affordable solution to fulfilling the Military Sealift Command’s requirements worldwide. The 338-foot long EPF vessel is an aluminum catamaran capable of transporting 600 tons, 1,200 nautical miles at an average speed of 35 knots, and is designed to operate in austere ports and waterways, too shallow and narrow for the larger ships in the surface fleet, providing added flexibility to U.S. warfighters worldwide. The ship’s flight deck can also support flight operations for a wide variety of manned and unmanned aircraft, including a CH-53 Super Stallion.
Austal Expeditionary Fast Transport ships

Austal Expeditionary Fast Transport ships


The Expeditionary Fast Transport Ships (EPF)’s large, open-mission deck and large habitable spaces provide the opportunity to conduct a wide range of missions including engagement and humanitarian assistance to disaster relief, maritime security support operations, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance across the world. The design of the EPF has a shallow draft of 13 feet and an advanced water jet propulsion system, enabling speeds greater than 40 knots. This capability provides EPF the versatility to access austere and degraded ports with minimal external assistance, enabling the vessels to support requirements in special operations, command and control, and support operations.