Category Archives: Naval Warfare

Italy Orders Three Additional ATR-42MP Patrol Aircraft

Leonardo has signed a contract with Guardia di Finanza valued at over 150 million euros for the supply of three ATR 72MPs and related technical-logistic support services. This contract completes the acquisition of four aircraft, the first order was placed in July 2018, awarded under a European tender. The first aircraft will be delivered by the end of 2019, with the remaining three units expected to be supplied by 2022.

Alessandro Profumo, CEO of Leonardo, said: “We are proud that Guardia di Finanza has chosen to rely once again on our ATR 72MP, an aircraft which fully represents Leonardo’s technological capabilities in terms of design and integration of platforms and systems at the highest levels.”

Lucio Valerio Cioffi, Aircraft Division MD at Leonardo, said: “The ATR 72MP combines reliability, low operating costs, all the advantages of the ATR 72-600 regional passenger transport aircraft together with a state-of-the-art mission system.”

Contract Valued at Over 150 Million Euros with Guardia di Finanza for the Supply of Three ATR 72MPs and Logistic Support Services

Contract Valued at Over 150 Million Euros with Guardia di Finanza for the Supply of Three ATR 72MPs and Logistic Support Services


The ATR 72MP will be integrated into the aeronautical capabilities of Guardia di Finanza, in the context of the multiple roles assigned to the Corps by the current regulatory framework. The Guardia di Finanza is the only law enforcement agency with general jurisdiction capable of exercising incisive and constant supervisory activities along the entire national coastal development and in international waters, carried out also due to the advanced technological equipment installed on its own aircraft.

Specific latest-generation capabilities embedded for the first time into the ATR 72MP will be useful to support dedicated surveillance activities entrusted to the Guardia di Finanza.

The ATR 72MP will operate in air-sea patrol and search missions, using on-board sensors to identify, even discreetly, sensitive objects, monitor their behavior, acquire evidence, and lead the intervention of naval units and land patrols.

The ATR 72MP – already in service with the Italian Armed Forces in a military version called P-72A – is equipped with the modular Leonardo ATOS (Airborne Tactical Observation and Surveillance) mission system. The ATOS manages the wide range of sensors of the aircraft, combining the information received in an overall tactical situation and presenting the results to the operators of the mission system in the most suitable format, providing an excellent and constantly updated scenario.

Thanks to its commercial derivation, the ATR 72MP delivers its crew levels of ergonomics that increase its efficiency and effectiveness during maritime patrol, search and identification missions, SAR (search and rescue) missions, counter drug trafficking, piracy, smuggling and preventing any illegal action across the territorial waters, which can typically last more than 8 hours.

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Northrop Grumman’s Integrated Power & Energy Systems (IPES)

Northrop Grumman’s Integrated Power & Energy Systems (IPES)

Utilizing the next generation of digital controls to enrich our power conversion and energy management capabilities, Northrop Grumman has developed a suite of power solutions using a modular, scalable, and flexible architecture. Northrop Grumman solutions can be configured to support a system, a collection of systems, or a complete platform. For large dynamic shipboard loads, Northrop Grumman has used our building blocks to create a modular and flexible Prime Power Equipment (PPE) architecture. Our power system is designed to support the wide range of electrical input power that can be present with shipboard systems and to operate within the harsh maritime environment. Additional modules or cabinets can be added as the application dictates. While Northrop Grumman has developed power quality control techniques that have been shown to save 80% or more in required energy storage, our systems can be expanded to include additional storage as the mission CONOPS requires.

Northrop Grumman’s Integrated Power & Energy Systems (IPES)

Northrop Grumman’s Integrated Power & Energy Systems (IPES)


Northrop Grumman embedded machinery control systems take advantage of Northrop Grumman lower power, modular electronics building blocks and real-time digital control products. These software-enabled control systems provide a tremendous level of flexibility and control over the machines, incorporating advanced control concepts in coordination with the overall electrical system and network controls. The result is a highly integrated system that is better suited to address transient and dynamic conditions as well as optimize component performance. The resulting reduction in size and weight are highly desirable in an environment where space is at a premium.
Northrop Grumman’s Integrated Power & Energy Systems (IPES)

Northrop Grumman’s Integrated Power & Energy Systems (IPES)


Northrop Grumman specializes in advanced power and control systems in the maritime environment and beyond. Northrop Grumman have designed modular and scalable power conversion and energy management solutions applicable at the system, enclave, and enterprise level. Northrop Grumman solutions are ideal in supporting the dynamic loads associated with advanced directed energy, radiated energy, and kinetic energy weapons and systems. We support our customer across the entire life cycle from requirements and architecture development to logistics and field support. Northrop Grumman experience across the entire electrical spectrum from generation to weapon system dynamics is key to providing an optimized solution and to effectively exploit system capabilities and provide efficiencies in the electrical system other integrators often overlook.

Northrop Grumman has been pushing the state-of-the-art with power quality controls, incorporation of energy storage, and the ability to support a variety of dynamic loads with the same power conversion equipment. We are proud to produce the most power dense, reliable, and robust military power and energy systems available, poised to support the needs of today and the fight of tomorrow.

P-8A gets new tool, extended search and rescue capability

P-8A gets new tool, extended search and rescue capability

Flying at a maximum speed of about 565 mph, at about 41,000 feet, the U.S. Navy’s P-8A Poseidon already covers an operational area of about 1,200 nautical miles during a four-hour on-station period. Now, add air-to-air refueling for extended range and endurance and an advanced search and rescue kit and officials say the P-8A is postured to respond to humanitarian missions around the globe. “The UNIPAC III Search and Rescue (SAR) kit is designed to substantially increase survivor assistance,” said Squadron Leader Nathan Mula, an Australian P-8A Flight Test Tactical officer stationed at Naval Air Station Patuxent River (PAX) in Maryland. Mula is part of the cooperative program at the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Office (PMA-290). “The kit increases the survivor assistance capability of the P-8A from 16 to 100 people in a single sortie.”

The testing, which is performed at PAX, but funded by the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) ensures those rescued are found and sustained with food, water and communications for an extended time. “The test program is a perfect example of the benefits reaped when two international partners join as part of a cooperative partnership,” Mula said. “Not only does the RAAF take a large step toward a major capability milestone, but the U.S. Navy receives the developmental and operational test experience and results.”

“By leveraging the developmental experience, both countries are able to increase their capability to provide assistance to survivors in the oceans around the world,” he said.

Operated by U.S Navy, Australia and India, the P-8 is performing maritime patrol and reconnaissance operations around the globe. Additionally, the United Kingdom, Norway, New Zealand and South Korea have ordered the aircraft with deliveries expected through the middle of the next decade.

The aircraft has proven valuable at search and rescue in addition to its core capabilities in maritime patrol, reconnaissance, intelligence and surveillance.

Some missions supported by the P-8A include operations to find the downed Malaysian airliner in 2014; and the rescue of castaways in 2016 when their large “Help” sign constructed from palm leaves stood out against the sands on Fanadik Island. In 2018, three fishermen were rescued in the South Pacific by a U.S. Navy Squadron with the help of UNIPAC-II SAR kit, the predecessor to the UNIPAC-III, which was the first time the U.S. Navy employed the system.

During testing there were both ground and flight tests, which included static ejection, safe separation and integration programs to certify the UNIPAC-III the Search and Rescue. During this test, testers evaluate the SAR kit [includes raft, food rations and drinking water], is studied approximately five miles off the coast of the Naval Air Station Patuxent River. (U.S. Navy photo/ Released)

During testing there were both ground and flight tests, which included static ejection, safe separation and integration programs to certify the UNIPAC-III the Search and Rescue. During this test, testers evaluate the SAR kit [includes raft, food rations and drinking water], is studied approximately five miles off the coast of the Naval Air Station Patuxent River. (U.S. Navy photo/ Released)


“Over the past year, we’ve performed numerous ground and flight tests, including static ejection, safe separation and integration programs to certify the UNIPAC-III,” said Katie Giewont, a P-8A Air Vehicle Stores Compatibility flight test engineer.

“It’s rewarding knowing we are providing the RAAF with the capability to rescue 100 survivors from a single P-8A. It’s incredible,” she said.

“The RAAF will perform additional operational testing in Australia later in the year, said RAAF Squadron Leader Lee McDowall. “It means a lot to us for the U.S. Navy to trust our specialists to perform the testing to their same standard.”

The RAAF monitors a region spanning from the Indian Ocean across to the Pacific and down to Antarctica, which equals approximately 10 percent of the earth’s entire surface, McDowall said.“We have an excellent working relationship as integrated members of the program office and as cooperative partners in the P-8A acquisition process,” he said.

The U.S. Navy will evaluate the UNIPAC-III for its own fleet, and will use outcomes from the RAAF’s operational tests to consider the potential introduction of the capability.

“There’s no other rescue capability like it in the world,” McDowall said

Royal Navy Experts Go On North Atlantic Sub Hunt

Royal Navy Experts Go On North Atlantic Sub Hunt

The Royal Navy’s anti-submarine experts working with HMS Queen Elizabeth have been pitting their wits against an American submarine in the North Atlantic.

HMS Northumberland and the specialist Merlin Mk2 of 820 Naval Air Squadron have gained invaluable information on tactics and skills required to protect an aircraft carrier from the threat beneath the waves while working with an allied US sub.

Type 23 frigate Northumberland used her specialist sonars, including the powerful towed array sonar, to hunt the submarine at range, keeping tabs on the sub before ‘destroying’ the target in training exercises.

Joining in the chase was the RNAS Culdrose-based Merlin Mk2, the aerial submarine hunting experts on Queen Elizabeth. The navy fliers utilised sonar buoys to cover a large area of ocean to prevent the submarine getting a clean shot at any of the UK Carrier Strike Group ships.

Royal Navy Experts Go On North Atlantic Sub Hunt

Royal Navy Experts Go On North Atlantic Sub Hunt


“As a submariner, it has been a fantastic opportunity to see life and fight from the other side,” Principal Warfare Officer, Lieutenant Commander Kris White, said.

“The challenging environment has been a hurdle the team and I have had to overcome and adapt to but it has been a hugely valuable exercise period, allowing me to utilise my submariner experience, helping to forge the tactics we will require for the Carrier Strike Group in 2021.”

Sonar Maintainer, Petty Officer Douglas Owen, added: “It has been a challenging period but one that I have relished.

“Being the Sonar Maintainer on an anti-submarine warfare frigate always attracts significant pressure, especially during a period of intensive training with a live submarine. It has been great to see the kit in action”.

The anti-submarine task group carried out a number of exercises, which varied in complexity and range to really test the UK ships.

Following the training, Northumberland, the Merlin Mk2 and RFA Tideforce joined up with the sub briefly before continuing their work on the Westlant 19 deployment.

Royal Navy Experts Go On North Atlantic Sub Hunt

Royal Navy Experts Go On North Atlantic Sub Hunt

Progeny Wins $115M to Upgrade Mk 48 mod 7 CBASS Torpedo Sonar

Progeny Wins $115M to Upgrade Mk 48 mod 7 CBASS Torpedo Sonar

Progeny Systems Corp., Manassas, Virginia, is awarded a $115,736,303 cost-plus-incentive-fee, firm-fixed-price, cost and cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for an upgrade to the Mk 48 mod 7 Common Broadband Advanced Sonar System (CBASS) heavyweight torpedo program, to include the following deliverables for associated subsystem electronic systems: detail design, engineering development models, proof-of-design units,proof-of-manufacturing units, low-rate initial production units and factory test equipment.

Also included in this procurement are related engineering and hardware repair services and provisioned-items orders. This contract includes options, which if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $186,567,981. Work will be performed in Manassas, Virginia (40%); Salt Lake City, Utah (18%); Middletown, Rhode Island (18%); Charleroi, Pennsylvania (17%); Cranston, Rhode Island (5%); and Annapolis, Maryland (2%), and is expected to be completed by February 2024. If all options are exercised, work will continue through August 2026.

Fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) funding in the amount of $5,790,000 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Federal Business Opportunities website, with three offers received. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity (N00024-19-C-6408).

Progeny Wins $115M to Upgrade Mk 48 mod 7 CBASS Torpedo Sonar

Progeny Wins $115M to Upgrade Mk 48 mod 7 CBASS Torpedo Sonar

Navy F/A-18C Hornet Makes Final Active-Duty Flight

Navy F/A-18C Hornet Makes Final Active-Duty Flight

The last Navy F/A-18C Hornet, aircraft number 300, made its official final active-duty flight at Naval Air Station Oceana, Oct. 2.

Assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 106 at Cecil Field, Florida, aircraft number 300 completed its first Navy acceptance check flight Oct. 14, 1988. Lt. Andrew Jalali, who piloted the Hornet for its final active-duty flight at Naval Air Station Oceana, was also born in 1988.

“Today marked the final United States Navy F/A-18C Operational Hornet flight,” said the Commodore, Command Strike Fighter Wing Atlantic, Capt. Brian Becker.

The aircraft has remained with the Gladiators for its entire 31-years of service. The aircraft took off from NAS Oceana accompanied by three F/A-18F Super Hornets for a one-and-a-half hour flight and return to Oceana where it will be officially stricken from the inventory, stripped of all its usable parts and be scrapped.

Navy F/A-18C Hornet Makes Final Active-Duty Flight

Navy F/A-18C Hornet Makes Final Active-Duty Flight


Becker said the F/A-18C aircraft has served admirably for over 30 years and highlighted its history in naval aviation.

“Its technological innovation was continued on the F/A-18 E/F/G aircraft and helped the U.S. Navy transition from 4th to 5th generation aircraft,” said Becker.

During the last year, VFA-106 has transferred over 50 F/A-18 Hornets to various Navy Reserve and U.S. Marine aviation commands, as well as, being placed in preservation for future use if needed.

Both the F/A-18A and F/A-18C Hornet variants have been replaced by the updated F/A-18E/F Super Hornets.

VFA-106 is the Navy’s East Coast Fleet Replacement Squadron, which trains naval aviators to fly the F/A-18 Super Hornets.

Navy F/A-18C Hornet Makes Final Active-Duty Flight

Navy F/A-18C Hornet Makes Final Active-Duty Flight

HMS SPEY named at official ceremony

HMS SPEY named at official ceremony

HMS SPEY, the last of five River Class Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPVs), was named today in front of gathered VIPs and employees at an official ceremony in Glasgow. In keeping with naval tradition, guests watched as Lady Johnstone, HMS SPEY’s sponsor, named the 2000 tonne vessel by releasing a bottle of special blend Spey whisky from Speyside Distillery that smashed against the ship’s hull.

HMS SPEY is the last in a class of five vessels that have been built in Glasgow. With construction starting on the first ship in late 2014, these vessels have provided an important opportunity to maintain essential design, construction and systems integration skills, while introducing new processes and technologies that are already being used in the production of the UK’s Type 26 frigates.

HMS SPEY named at official ceremony

HMS SPEY named at official ceremony


David Shepherd, OPV Programme Director said: “Today’s ceremony is a truly significant milestone for the River Class Offshore Patrol Vessel programme and builds on our proud heritage of British shipbuilding here in Glasgow. There has been fantastic momentum on this programme and the naming of HMS SPEY serves as a great reminder of the importance of the capability and skills of our employees who are working together with the Royal Navy and partners to deliver these important ships.”

Defence Minister Anne-Marie Trevelyan said: “Our Offshore Patrol Vessels play a pivotal role in patrolling our coastline, protecting our domestic waters, and supporting maritime interests from anti-smuggling to fisheries protection. The naming of HMS SPEY is an exciting milestone for the OPV programme, demonstrating our commitment to UK shipyards while bolstering the Royal Navy’s capabilities.”

HMS SPEY will aid in a range of operations from counter-terrorism, and anti-smuggling to securing the UK’S borders to help keep Britain safe, making her a valuable addition to the Royal Navy fleet.
HMS Forth and HMS Medway, the first two ships in the class, are now in service with the Royal Navy.