Category Archives: Naval Warfare

NNS Completes Installation of USS George Washington (CVN 73) Main Mast

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ Newport News Shipbuilding division has reached new heights in the refueling and complex overhaul (RCOH) of the aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73). The shipyard installed the final piece of the ship’s new main mast—the 34-foot upper mast section—that raises the ship’s distinctive profile 123 feet above the flight deck. The RCOH now is 50 percent complete.

NNS Completes Installation of USS George Washington (CVN 73) Main Mast

NNS Completes Installation of USS George Washington (CVN 73) Main Mast


“Landing the upper mast is one of the most visible construction milestones in the mid-life refueling overhaul and maintenance availability of an aircraft carrier,” said Chris Miner, Newport News’ vice president, in-service aircraft carrier programs. “We are making significant progress with George Washington and look forward to returning a fully recapitalized, mission-ready ship to the fleet for another 25 years of service.”
NNS Completes Installation of USS George Washington (CVN 73) Main Mast

NNS Completes Installation of USS George Washington (CVN 73) Main Mast


To commemorate the milestone, George Washington sailors on Friday held a brief mast-stepping ceremony that recognizes an ancient maritime custom of placing a coin underneath the ship’s mast to bring good fortune. A time capsule containing photos, a piece of the old mast, several coins and other artifacts was attached to a metal plate, which later will be welded under the mast.
NNS Completes Installation of USS George Washington (CVN 73) Main Mast

NNS Completes Installation of USS George Washington (CVN 73) Main Mast


“Mast-stepping is a way to link the past with the future,” said Capt. Glenn Jamison, the ship’s commanding officer. “It is a way to honor the heritage of this ship and our namesake. George Washington once said that ‘without a decisive naval force we can do nothing definitive, and with it, everything honorable and glorious.’ Now, with this new mast signifying the progress we’re making during RCOH, USS George Washington is ready to carry on the mantle of representing the Navy as only General George Washington could have imagined and wanted.”
NNS Completes Installation of USS George Washington (CVN 73) Main Mast

NNS Completes Installation of USS George Washington (CVN 73) Main Mast


The ship arrived at Newport News in August 2017 to begin the complex engineering and construction project and is currently in dry dock for hull and freeboard blasting and painting; repairs to its propellers, sea chests, shafts and rudders; and defueling and refueling of its power plant.

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Huntington Ingalls secures $1.47 billion deal for US Navy LPD 30

Huntington Ingalls secures $1.47 billion deal for US Navy LPD 30

Huntington Ingalls Industries announced on March 26 that its Ingalls Shipbuilding division has received a $US 1.47 billion, cost-plus-fixed-fee contract from the U.S. Navy for the detail design and construction of the amphibious transport dock Landing Platform Dock (LPD) 30. The ship will be the 14th in the San Antonio class and the first Flight II LPD. LPD 30 is the evolution of the dock landing platform that strengthens the Navy and Marine Corps’ needs in future warfare. Utilizing the LPD 17 class’ proven hull, this LPD derivative is highly adaptable and, like the first 13 ships in the class, will be used to accomplish a full range of military operations—from major combat to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. The ship’s versatility—from its well deck, flight deck and hospital facilities to its self-defense and survivability features—provides a viable platform for America’s global defense needs.

“Ingalls looks forward to continuing our strong legacy of providing the men and women of our naval forces with the capable and survivable warships they need and deserve,” said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. “The LPD Flight II builds upon the significant investment that has been made in this platform to improve the capability and flexibility of our deployed Navy-Marine Corps team. LPD 30 will leverage a hot production line and further benefit from the investments we continue to make in our shipbuilders and facilities. We are honored to be a part of the team that will provide this next-generation platform today.”

Huntington Ingalls secures $1.47 billion deal for US Navy LPD 30

Huntington Ingalls secures $1.47 billion deal for US Navy LPD 30


Ingalls has delivered 11 San Antonio-class ships to the Navy and has two more under construction. Fort Lauderdale (LPD 28) will launch in 2020 and deliver in 2021; the keel for Richard M. McCool Jr. (LPD 29) will be laid later this year. Start of fabrication on LPD 30 is scheduled for 2020. The San Antonio class is a major part of the Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long, 105-foot-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

Tactical Missiles Corporation (KTRV)

Tactical Missiles Corporation (KTRV)

JSC Tactical Missiles Corporation (Корпорация Тактическое Ракетное Вооружение) or KTRV is a major Russian weapon (especially missiles) manufacturer. Headquarters in Korolyov, Moscow Oblast. Tactical Missiles Corporation joint stock company (JSC) was established in accordance with Federal Target Program such as “Restructuring and development of Defense Industry Complex” (2002-2006 years) and Presidential Decree № 84 dated 24 January 2002. The Corporation as an integrated structure was formed on the basis of a reorganized federal state unitary enterprise “State research and production centre “Zvezda-Strela” (Korolev) in “Tactical Missiles Corporation”JSC. During such reorganization process the Corporation received shares from enterprises included in Defense Industry Complex. Establishment registration of the Corporation was finished in March 2003.

Tactical Missiles Corporation (KTRV)

Tactical Missiles Corporation (KTRV)


Tactical Missiles Corporation was founded on the basis of Zvezda-Strela by the Decree of Russian President №84, signed on January 24, 2002. Zvezda-Strela was a major designer and producer of military missile systems, and included the Zvezda Experimental Design Bureau (OKB), a serial production design bureau (SKB), the main Strela plant, and machine building plants in Kostroma and Bendery (Moldova). It was formerly part of the missile-industry grouping Spetstekhnika (Special Equipment). The structure of Tactical Missiles Corporation was expanded by subsequent decrees №591 on May 9, 2004 and №930 on July 20, 2007.
Tactical Missiles Corporation (KTRV)

Tactical Missiles Corporation (KTRV)


Austal awarded 369 million U.S. Navy contract for Expeditionary Fast Transport ships

Austal awarded 369 million U.S. Navy contract for Expeditionary Fast Transport ships

Austal Limited (Austal) has been awarded a new A$369 (US$261,776,539) million contract for two additional Expeditionary Fast Transport Ships (EPF) by the U.S. Navy. The contract award extends the EPF program to 2022, with construction of EPF 13 to commence in late 2019 and EPF 14 to follow in the middle of 2020. The contract follows the award for long-lead time materials on EPF 13 and EPF 14 that was announced in December 2018. The 14-ship, EPF program has to date been worth over US$2 billion and underscores the ability of Austal USA to build highly capable ships at an affordable cost.

Austal Expeditionary Fast Transport ships

Austal Expeditionary Fast Transport ships


“The extension of this program to 14 vessels is a result of the versatility of the EPF platform to perform an increasing range of roles for the U.S. Navy combined with the confidence our customer has in it. We continue to believe that the EPF vessel, in various configurations, has a long future ahead of it,” Austal CEO, David Singleton said. “We have a proven ability to build these cost effective vessels efficiently at our state-of-the-art manufacturing facility in Mobile, Alabama and as a result they will continue to underpin the shipyard for several years to come. We are pleased to add these new vessels to what is already a record order book, which includes the contract Austal recently received for two additional Independence Class, Littoral Combat Ships (LCS).
Austal Expeditionary Fast Transport ships

Austal Expeditionary Fast Transport ships


Austal was awarded the initial contract to design and build the first 103-meter EPF in November 2008. Since then, ten Spearhead-class EPFs have been delivered and are serving as an affordable solution to fulfilling the Military Sealift Command’s requirements worldwide. The 338-foot long EPF vessel is an aluminum catamaran capable of transporting 600 tons, 1,200 nautical miles at an average speed of 35 knots, and is designed to operate in austere ports and waterways, too shallow and narrow for the larger ships in the surface fleet, providing added flexibility to U.S. warfighters worldwide. The ship’s flight deck can also support flight operations for a wide variety of manned and unmanned aircraft, including a CH-53 Super Stallion.
Austal Expeditionary Fast Transport ships

Austal Expeditionary Fast Transport ships


The Expeditionary Fast Transport Ships (EPF)’s large, open-mission deck and large habitable spaces provide the opportunity to conduct a wide range of missions including engagement and humanitarian assistance to disaster relief, maritime security support operations, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance across the world. The design of the EPF has a shallow draft of 13 feet and an advanced water jet propulsion system, enabling speeds greater than 40 knots. This capability provides EPF the versatility to access austere and degraded ports with minimal external assistance, enabling the vessels to support requirements in special operations, command and control, and support operations.

Ortega Submersibles

Ortega Submersibles

Ortega Submersibles is based on a WWII SBS project called “MSC Sleeping Beauty”by sir Quintin Reeves, one of the real world inspirations for the character Q from the 007 novels, was one of the inventors working for Station IX, one of the British armed forces R&D groups. Reeves is credited as the inventor of the Welrod silenced pistol, the first night vision goggles, and the Welbum, an aptly named motor for military divers meant to be mounted to the diver’s lower back. Last, but by no means least, he also designed the Motorized Submersible Canoe, nicknamed “Sleeping Beauty” due to an anecdote where he was found sleeping in it. the Sleeping Beauty was a one-man craft designed for infiltration operations.

Ortega Submersibles

Ortega Submersibles


Inspired by the basic concept of the Sleeping Beauty, Ortega Submersibles produces Swimmer Delivery Vehicles (SDV). The vehicles are developed with the goal of transporting divers in a quick and comfortable manner. Due to the extended range the vehicles can be dropped at a safe distance from the mission target. In combination with large cargo capacity and more mission specific load, new kinds of missions are possible. Ortega Submersibles are non atmospheric SDV’s. The weight of the hull and all its component is compensated by built in floats which make the SDV neutrally buoyant. A closed loop trimming system can adjust buoyancy to positive or negative, giving the option of flexible cargo weight on infiltration and extraction missions. Also it gives the option to park and leave the SDV on the sea-floor.
Ortega Submersibles

Ortega Submersibles


Ortega Submersibles is being designed for the Dutch special forces, and comes fully equipped with a trim tank, onboard rebreathers, an on-board HUD supplying important navigational data and also a double redundant analog navigational and control system. Its honeycomb structure is filled with air for buoyancy. Pending the skill and equipment of the operator dive depths of up to 40 meters are supported. The Mk. 1C also features a high framerate 3D Sonar system that is capable of resolving objects, environments and threats in great detail. This system makes navigating in zero visibility possible. There is also two infrared cameras on the nose with a direct feed to the cockpit as well as six LED lights. A FLIR camera for surface use is also present. The Ortega can be parked underwater and left for multiple weeks if necessary. A fully autonomous secondary control system is in development. Rubber mounted ultra silent motors, special noise absorbing materials and coating ensure a low Sonar profile.
Ortega Submersibles

Ortega Submersibles


Powered by two 10 KWh electric trusters, it is capable of a high surface and submersed speed. An on board trimming-system and air supply makes it possible to extend bottom times. Each sub has a variety of dopplers, sonars, INS’s and other sensors to suit your needs. All on-board equipment supports dive depths of up to 95 meters/310 feet. Teering is done by two rudders and two front fins. Two additional thrusters, mounted vertically and horizontally in the bow help steering in tight spaces and make docking easier. Due to the open superstructure, safely leaving the SDV is always possible. Onboard air tanks allow divers to switch from gas to rebreather. The SDV can be outfitted with various navigation systems. Ortega Submersibles has redefined this remarkable way of underwater travel by using highly advanced naval technology. The Ortega Submersibles is an ergonomic, multi-purpose submersible of the highest quality in modern Dutch Engineering.

MARSUN - M18 Fast Assault Bboat

MARSUN – M18 Fast Assault Boat


The M18 Fast Assault Boat is designed to operate under extreme environmental conditions and able to conduct the full spectrum of Patrol missions , developed for the Royal Thai Navy by Marsun . Marsun Thailand is prepared to adapt any combat suit configuration and install relevant hardware and assume the system integration responsibility to meet the operational requirements of any customer in full. Very low draught, long endurance, high speed in excess of 40+ knots, high maneuverability is some of the features that make the M18 a superior standard platform for all types of missions to be conducted by this type of vessel.

MARSUN - M18 Fast Assault Boat

MARSUN – M18 Fast Assault Boat


This Assault Boat consist of a thoroughly defined state of the art concept of the platform systems in conjunction with a logistic, training and financing package taking in particular the support of the ships into consideration. The M18 Fast Assault Boat has been designed to operate in various missions in shallow water as well as in deep water sea areas. This is achieved by a careful selected hull form, by an advanced partly twin water jet construction at low draught and sophisticated redundant equipment.
MARSUN - M18 Fast Assault Boat

MARSUN – M18 Fast Assault Boat


The M18 is very high speed with excellent maneuverability and stability. Inclined platform at aft for underway launching and hauling 2 of fully equipped and manned RHIBs. A bow ramp is specially designed for Special Operation Forces under deck could be deployed and recovered from the beaching/landing operation. Protection of territorial waters, law enforcement at littoral waters and high sea, protection of ports, rivers, off-shore and in-shore facilities and undertaking surveillance and reconnaissance. Performing insertion and exsertion of fully equipped Special Operation Forces rapidly in and out of combat areas.
MARSUN - M18 Fast Assault Boat

MARSUN – M18 Fast Assault Boat


Established since 1980, Marsun Public Company Limited is strategically located near Bangkok at Samutprakarn, at the mouth of the Chao Phraya River. Marsun has delivered over 309 various types of vessels. These include Fast Patrol Craft, Fast Attack Missile Craft, Crew and Supply Vessels, Ferries, Motor Yachts, Oil Spill Recovery Vessels, Multi-Purpose Craft etc. In addition to these, Marsun has also provided consultation on design, construction and repair to meet wide-ranging requirements for both domestic and international customers. Since 2000, the company has aggressively served the needs of the international marine market. This has resulted in Marsun winning a number of international tenders.
MARSUN - M18 Fast Assault Boat

MARSUN – M18 Fast Assault Boat

Royal Australian Navy to extend service life of Anzac-class frigates amid concerns about sustainment

Royal Australian Navy to extend service life of Anzac-class frigates amid concerns about sustainment

The Anzac-class frigates is half way through its original service life-of-type. The first frigate was expected to be withdrawn from service during 2024–25 and the last during 2032–33. In June 2018, the Australian Government announced that Hunter class frigates (under the SEA 5000 program) would replace the ANZAC class of ships, with the first Hunter class frigate scheduled to enter service in the late 2020s.1 To accommodate the design, build and introduction into service of the Hunter class frigates, Anzac-class frigates original withdrawal dates have been extended, with the first frigate to now be withdrawn in 2029–30 and the last in 2042–43.

The Department of Defence’s (Defence) Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group is responsible for the sustainment of the Anzac-class frigates. Royal Australian Navy has advised the Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group of its requirements and budget for the sustainment of the ANZAC frigates in a Materiel Sustainment Agreement. The budget for the sustainment of the eight ANZAC class frigates for 2018–19 is $374.0 million — 15 per cent of Navy’s overall sustainment budget of $2,422.4 million for that year. The approved budget to sustain the ANZAC class from 2018–19 to 2026–27 is $3.4 billion.

Royal Australian Navy HMAS Ballarat

Royal Australian Navy HMAS Ballarat


The Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) is warning the navy is not doing enough to maintain the seaworthiness of the backbone of the fleet and failed to properly examine whether the ANZAC class frigates are physically capable of having their service life extended by up to a decade beyond their planned retirement. In a scathing report, te auditor-general found the navy’s sustainment activities had “not kept pace with higher than expected operational usage” of the eight frigates and criticised the Defence Department for failing to show the efficiency or outcomes of these maintenance arrangements. The ANAO also said Defence had been aware since at least 2012 of this “misalignment” between its sustainment activities and budget and the warships’ higher operational tempo.

he Anzac class (also identified as the ANZAC class and the MEKO 200 ANZ type) is a ship class of ten frigates; eight operated by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) and two operated by the Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN). The project name (and later, the class name) is taken from the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps of the First World War. The Royal Australian Navy (Navy) operates eight ANZAC class frigates. The frigates were commissioned between 1996 and 2006, and form part of Navy’s core surface warship capability. The ANZAC class is used to: conduct surveillance and patrols; protect shipping and strategic areas; provide naval gunfire in support of the Army; and undertake disaster relief and search and rescue activities.

Royal Australian Navy HMAS Arunta

Royal Australian Navy HMAS Arunta