Category Archives: Naval Warfare

REBS Giraffe Tracer Pneumatic Pole

REBS Giraffe Tracer Pneumatic Pole

The REBS Giraffe Tracer is a pneumatic powered extension and retraction pole for boarding and entering. The Giraffe features an easy to use pneumatic system with push button control for precision up and down movements. The control handle is collapsible and adjustable to retain a slim profile when not in use. Use the push-buttons to activate the efficient pneumatic system. Thanks to the simple controls the operator can concentrate on the aiming and timing aspects of the operation. The retraction button has two speeds: push it half-way in to release the pressure and let gravity retract the pole. The rapid action eccentric handle lock is prepared for use or collapsed into transportation-position in a few seconds. The versatile baseplate(s) are available in multiple sizes to allow the pole to be attached to nearly any location, such as the deck of a RHIB.

REBS Giraffe Tracer Pneumatic Pole

REBS Giraffe Tracer Pneumatic Pole


The Rapid Entering and Boarding Systems (REBS) segment was established at Henriksen in 2003 as a response to an initiative from the Norwegian Defense. They sought products that could increase the effectiveness and safety of boarding operations, especially at sea. With time, REBS has evolved into a result of a multinational cooperation where input from users in different countries has resulted in product improvements and reduced operational risk. Henriksen is specialized in Rapid Entering and Boarding Systems (REBS): ladders, ultralight pole ladders (UPL), carbon multi ladders (CML), hooks, giraffe tracer pneumatic poles, launchers, ascenders, magnetic climbing systems, scuba tubes, etc.
REBS Giraffe Tracer Pneumatic Pole

REBS Giraffe Tracer Pneumatic Pole


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Metal Shark Building patrol boats for Peruvian Navy

Metal Shark Building patrol boats for Peruvian Navy

US shipbuilder Metal Shark has received a contract to deliver two aluminium patrol boats for the Peruvian Navy. Peruvian Navy officials announced the order from aboard the polar oceanographic research vessel B.A.P. Carrasco. Although the Peruvian Navy did not disclose the model of the vessels, the descriptions suggest that they will be Metal Shark’s 45 Defiant-class patrol boats. The two 15-meter patrol boats will be used for maritime surveillance, illegal fishing prevention and the protection of marine fauna. The vessels will be used by the Peruvian Coast Guard (Dirección General de Capitanías y Guardacostas de la Marina de Guerra: DICAPI), which reports to the navy.

Metal Shark Building 45 Defiant Patrol Boats

Metal Shark Building 45 Defiant Patrol Boats


According to Peruvian defense ministry information, the boats will have a minimum speed of 40 knots and will accommodate up to 9 passengers. They will be equipped with video surveillance systems, radars, GPS and UHF, VHF, HF and satellite communication systems. The reconfigurable boats are operationally proven as the builder has already delivered 45 Defiants to the US defense department. The 45 Defiant features a proven Metal Shark hull design that has been engineered and built to precise tolerances. To achieve its superior hull life rating of 30+ years, the vessel’s hull, deck, and pilothouse structure are composed entirely of heavy, welded plates of premium-grade 5086 aluminum alloy. The hull has been specifically balanced and will steer a straight course and turn predictably and safely without chine hooking or other unnatural turning behaviors
Metal Shark Building 45 Defiant Patrol Boats

Metal Shark Building 45 Defiant Patrol Boats

Boeing Insitu ScanEagle UAVs sold to Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, Vietnam

Boeing Insitu ScanEagle UAVs sold to Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, Vietnam

Boeing subsidiary Insitu Inc is awarded $47,930,791 contract for 34 ScanEagle unmanned air vehicles for the governments of Malaysia (12); Indonesia (8); Philippines (8); and Vietnam (6). This order combines purchases for the governments of Malaysia ($19,329,334; 40 percent); Philippines ($9,633,665; 20 percent); Vietnam ($9,770,120; 20 percent); and Indonesia ($9,197,672; 20 percent) under the Foreign Military Sales program. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. In addition, this order provides for spare payloads, spare and repair parts, support equipment, tools, training, technical services, and field service representatives. Work will be performed in Bingen, Washington (77 percent); and multiple shore and at sea locations in Malaysia (9 percent); Philippines (5 percent); Vietnam (5 percent); and Indonesia (4 percent), and is expected to be completed in March 2022.

A Boeing Insitu ScanEagle UAVs in its catapult launcher

A Boeing Insitu ScanEagle UAVs in its catapult launcher


The ScanEagle is a small, long-endurance, low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) built by Insitu, a subsidiary of Boeing, and is used for reconnaissance. The ScanEagle continues to receive improvements through upgrades and changes. ScanEagle emerged as the result of a strategic alliance between Boeing and Insitu. The resulting technology has been successful as a portable Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) for autonomous surveillance in the battlefield, and has been deployed since August 2004 in the Iraq War. ScanEagle carries a stabilized electro-optical and/or infrared camera on a lightweight inertial stabilized turret system, and an integrated communications system having a range of over 62 miles (100 km); it has a flight endurance of over 20 hours. ScanEagle needs no airfield for deployment. Instead, it is launched using a pneumatic launcher, patented by Insitu, known as the “SuperWedge” launcher. It is recovered using the “Skyhook” retrieval system, which uses a hook on the end of the wingtip to catch a rope hanging pole.
A Boeing Insitu ScanEagle UAVsis recovered at sea aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Oscar Austin (DDG-79).

A Boeing Insitu ScanEagle UAVsis recovered at sea aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Oscar Austin (DDG-79).

Pakistan to buy Zargana torpedo countermeasures for Agoste-Class Submarines

Pakistan to buy Zargana torpedo countermeasures for Agoste-Class Submarines

Turkish defense company Aselsan will meet the Pakistani Naval Forces’ countermeasure system needs against torpedo missiles with its domestically developed system. With the purchase, Pakistan becomes the second country after Indonesia to use the Zargana, which is the first and only system developed in Turkey and superior than its counterparts worldwide. The Zargana Anti-Torpedo Countermeasure System for submarines was developed by the defense company for foreign purchasers as a different version of the domestic system. The system Pakistan is set to buy will also be adapted to the country’s Khalid (Agosta 90B)-class diesel-electricsubmarines. Aselsan has also supplied the Zoka system to Indonesia for the service’s Nagapasa (Chang Bogo)-class submarines. Zargana System uses Zoka Acoustic jammers and decoys.

Pakistan to buy Zargana torpedo countermeasures for Agoste-Class Submarines

Pakistan to buy Zargana torpedo countermeasures for Agoste-Class Submarines


The Zargana provides the highest level of defense against torpedoes with its autonomous operation and quick reaction time and can be integrated into operator-controlled inputs or submarine systems that provide real-time data. The countermeasure tactics of the system include evasive maneuvering, different deployment patterns and acoustic jammers/decoys. After detecting and classifying the threat, the system determines the most appropriate avoidance tactic against torpedoes targeting submarines while taking into account environmental conditions with real-time data provided by the submarine. Acoustic jammers deployed by the system prevent the torpedo from detecting the submarine’s location, while acoustic decoys imitate the submarine and deceive the torpedo. The missile and launcher system has up to 24 different launcher cells, single or salvo firing with high reliability and fireproofing properties.

PLA Naval Aviation

PLA Naval Aviation

The People’s Liberation Army Naval Aviation (PLA Naval Aviation, PLA Naval Air Force) is the naval aviation branch of the People’s Liberation Army Navy. Historically, the PLA Naval Aviation’s main role has been to provide the navy’s warships with air defense coverage. Part of the coastal defense doctrine was to have naval aircraft protecting the ships, hence the reason why many PLA ships of the 1960s–70s lacked long range anti-aircraft missiles or artillery. During the Sino-Vietnamese War, the PLA Naval Aviation carried out many successful bombing and airstrike missions against Vietnamese territories, such as in the Spratly Islands. The 1960s saw a series of air combat sorties flown against Taiwanese intruders. Historical aircraft operated by the PLA Naval Aviation include the J-5, the J-6, and H-5. These aircraft have been retired by the late 1990s.

PLA Naval Aviation Xian JH-7A Fighter Bomber

PLA Naval Aviation Xian JH-7A Fighter Bomber


Today, the PLA Naval Aviation has a strength of around 26,000 personnel and 690+ aircraft. It operates similar aircraft to the People’s Liberation Army Air Force, including fighters, bombers, strike aircraft, tankers, reconnaissance, electronic warfare, maritime patrol, seaplane, transport, training and helicopter types. The PLA Naval Aviation has traditionally received older aircraft than the PLAAF and has taken less ambitious steps towards mass modernization. Advancements in new technologies, weaponry and aircraft acquisition were made after 2000. The modern day PLA Naval Aviation is capable of performing a number of roles, and is quite numerically and technologically adept in anti-ship and air defense operations.
PLA Naval Aviation Harbin SH-5 Amphibious Aircraft

PLA Naval Aviation Harbin SH-5 Amphibious Aircraft


The PLA Naval Aviation would undergo significant change once China’s first aircraft carrier is fully operational. Near the end of October 2006, Russian state-run weapon exporter Rosoboronexport was completing negotiations with China to deliver up to 48 Sukhoi Su-33 (Flanker-D) carrier-capable fighter aircraft in a purchase deal reportedly worth $2.5 billion. The Su-33 is a variant of Sukhoi’s Su-27 Flanker with canards, foldings wings, an arrester hook, a reinforced structure, and other modifications that help it deal with carrier operations and landings. As of 2011, SAC is developing its own naval jet, called Shenyang J-15, which first flew in 2009. The Shenyang J-31 may be a future carrier based stealth fighter in the same role as the F-35C.

Royal Navy HMS Defender Type 45 Destroyer missile firing

Royal Navy HMS Defender Type 45 Destroyer missile firing

In a burst of fire and smoke, Royal Navy warship HMS Defender has tested her world-beating missile system off the coast of Scotland. Blasting from the Type 45 destroyer’s silo, the missile flew four times the speed of sound before obliterating an incoming drone target designed to simulate a projectile attack on the ship. It marks the first time HMS Defender has taken on this particular type of target – one that is significantly more challenging as it flies faster and lower than others before it. The missile firing took place as part of NATO Exercise Formidable Shield. It proves the Portsmouth-based ship’s ability to defend herself and other ships around her from attack.

Royal Navy HMS Defender Type 45 Destroyer missile firing

Royal Navy HMS Defender Type 45 Destroyer missile firing


Just two and a half seconds after erupting from HMS Defender’s silo, the missile accelerates to more than four times the speed of sound – otherwise known as Mach 4. High over the seas, it then manoeuvres at G-forces which no human being could withstand, to close in and destroy the target. Sea Viper is the combination of the Sampson radar system – the distinctive spinning spiked ball on top of a Type 45 destroyer’s main mast – and the Aster missile system which sits in a silo on the ship’s forecastle. The system tracks aircraft and other objects across thousands of cubic miles of airspace, identifies threats, and destroys them when necessary.
Royal Navy HMS Defender Type 45 Destroyer missile firing

Royal Navy HMS Defender Type 45 Destroyer missile firing


These were all put to the test during Exercise Formidable Shield with almost every nation involved firing missiles throughout the 10-day exercise. Equipped with a Wildcat helicopter from Yeovilton-based 815 Naval Air Squadron, state-of-the-art Sampson radar and the Sea Viper missile system, HMS Defender was a potent addition alongside nine other navies at the Hebrides range in Scotland. Led by the US Navy’s 6th Fleet, the exercise was the largest of its type with 13 ships, more than 10 aircraft and in excess of 3,300 personnel taking part. Lieutenant Commander Ben Shirley, HMS Defender’s Weapon Engineer Officer, said: “Maintaining relationships and our ability to work with other nations is vital to the defence of the UK.
Royal Navy HMS Defender Type 45 Destroyer missile firing

Royal Navy HMS Defender Type 45 Destroyer missile firing


HMS Defender is the fifth of the Type 45 or Daring-class air-defence destroyers built for the Royal Navy. She is the eighth ship to bear the name. Defender’s construction began at the BAE Systems Naval Ships (now part of BAE Systems Surface Ships) yard at Govan on the River Clyde in July 2006. The ship completed her first sea trials in October–November 2011, and was commissioned during March 2013. The Type 45 destroyer, also known as the D or Daring class, is primarily designed for anti-aircraft and anti-missile warfare and is built around the PAAMS (Sea Viper) air-defence system utilizing the SAMPSON AESA and the S1850M long-range radars.

Brazil Navy replaces gun systems on Piratini-class patrol boat

Brazil Navy replaces gun systems on Piratini-class patrol boat

The Brazilian Navy has recently armed its Piratini-class patrol ships – NPa Piratini (P10), NPa Pirajá (P11), NPa Penedo (P14), and NPa Poti (P15) – with manually controlled 20 mm Oerlikon GAM-B01 gun mounts, replacing the 20 mm pedestal-mounted Oerlikon Mk 10 gun system. The boats also are armed with 12.7 mm machine guns. The Oerlikon 20 mm cannon is a series of autocannons, based on an original German 20 mm Becker design that appeared very early in World War I, with various models employed by both Allied and Axis forces during World War II, and many versions still in use today. The gun system installation is meant to upgrade the ships with newer weapons and was co-ordinated by the Navy Weapon Systems Directorate and performed by the Navy Systems Maintenance Center, the River Base of Ladário, and personnel of the flotilla.

Brazil Navy replaces gun systems on Piratini-class patrol boat

Brazil Navy replaces gun systems on Piratini-class patrol boat


The six Piratini-class patrol boats are a series of patrol vessels that were built for the Brazilian Navy at the Rio de Janeiro Navy Arsenal. Based on the United States Coast Guard Cape-class cutter design, they were built between 1970–1971 as coastal patrol vessels. In 1993 they were moved from coastal patrol to riverine patrol. The patrol fleet is fielded by the Mato Grosso Flotilla Command of the 6th Naval District Command of Ladário in Mato Grosso do Sul state. It is mainly used to patrol rivers in the states of Mato Grosso and Mato Grosso do Sul. The boats also are armed with 12.7 mm machine guns.