Category Archives: Ground Warfare

BAMSE SRSAM Ground Based Missile System

BAMSE SRSAM Ground Based Missile System

The BAMSE SRSAM system is one of few systems in the world today that is developed and optimised as a de­dicated Ground-Based Air Defence (GBAD) missile system. The RBS 23, designated BAMSE, is a Swedish medium range, all-weather capable air defense system developed by Bofors and Ericsson Microwave Systems (now both in the Saab group). BAMSE SRSAM is designed for flexible usage both for stand-alone operation as well as in networks with other sensors and weapon systems. The philosophy is to optimise system effect by having a number of fully co-ordinated firing units that together create a ground coverage for the system of more than 2,100 km2 and an effective altitude coverage of 15,000 m. The BAMSE SRSAM system has excellent built-in ECCM capabilities both in the GIRAFFE AMB surveillance radar and the unique monopulse Fire Control Radar (FCR) Automatic Command to Line Of Sight (ACLOS) missile guidance function.

BAMSE SRSAM Ground Based Missile System

BAMSE SRSAM Ground Based Missile System


The BAMSE system is a state of the art system with several unique capabilities. The system has been developed for a conscript Army with the strong requirement for easy operation and maintenance. The BAMSE system has extensive Built in Test Equipment (BITE), which minimises the need for special test equipment. The BAMSE system is also developed to have high redundancy where every single missile launcher has the capability to combat targets without any connection to an external information source or higher command.The BAMSE system has unique high altitude coverage and is effective with maintained high missile manoeuvrability at 15,000 m altitude. Every single missile launcher has C2 capabilities. BAMSE has high survivability with ballistic protection on every missile launcher and outstanding ECCM capabilities. The BAMSE system has the possibility to have integrated IFF on every missile launcher in order to further strengthen the possibility to act as autonomous units, if necessary. The system has been specially developed to combat small and fast targets as well as low flying cruise missiles and UAVs.
BAMSE SRSAM Ground Based Missile System

BAMSE SRSAM Ground Based Missile System


The system consists of a Surveillance and Control Centre (SCC) and two to four Missile Control Centers (MCC). The missile control center trailers are located up to 20 km away from the SCC and interconnected via a cable or radio communications (up to 15 km). The SCC is operated by a crew of one or two. It comprises an Ericsson GIRAFFE Radar 3D surveillance radar with an antenna mast of 8 to 13 meters. It is used for threat evaluation, combat coordination, with target acquisition, identification, tracking and prioritisation. The SCC can coordinate up to four missile control centres. The system has a built-in simulation capability to carry out training. The missile control center trailer depends on transportation vehicles which also carry additional missiles for reloading operations. The center is protected against fragments and nuclear, biological and chemical threats. It has two computer stations and is operated by one or two persons. It comprises a Ka-band fire control radar with an 8 meters mast, IRST (infrared sensor for surveillance and tracking), IFF system, six ready-to-fire BAMSE missiles, and weather sensors. The MCC can be deployed in 10 minutes and complete reload of a MCC takes less than 4 minutes. The missile used by the RBS 23 system is based on the RBS 70, but unlike its predecessor (which is laser beam rider) it is a radar command control ACLOS missile, which means that the missile itself and the target have to be tracked by the fire control radar until impact. A booster has been added also. The missile is claimed to have high acceleration and high manoeuvrability. It is equipped with a fragmentation and shaped charge warhead and with both a proximity fuse and an impact fuse. Range is 20 km.
BAMSE SRSAM Ground Based Missile System

BAMSE SRSAM Ground Based Missile System


To successfully meet threat scenarios, the BAMSE system has been provided with all vital capabilities for defeating the present threat and that of the foreseeable future with the following unique capabilities:

  • Optimised situational awarenes
  • A large number of SHORADS can be connected
  • Freedom of deployment due to elevated platforms
    Short deployment time; a complete battery is combat- ready in less than lOmin
  • Short reloading time; all six missiles in less than 5 min
    Flexible system, several MCCs controlled by one GIRAFFE AMB
  • Embedded simulator in every unit
  • Maintenance-free missiles
  • Extensive BITE for every unit and a simplified maintenance concept
  • Long servicable life and Low Life Cycle Cost (LCC)
  • Optional C-RAM warning capability
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SA-10U Command Vehicle

SA-10U Command Vehicle

SA-10U is a special vehicle that ensures a secure communication within a unit at the operational and tactical level. Improving troop command and control is one of the tasks of Kyiv enterprise NTK “Impulse”, which continues serial production of SA-10U command and staff vehicles currently used for ensuring communication and coordination of units by the Armed Forces of Ukraine. It is completely protected from enemy electronic warfare means, uses various communication channels, including satellite communications. The SA-10U developers paid special attention to digital equipment by developing and implementing special software that ensures transmission of protected information between units in field conditions and in conditions of active enemy countermeasures.

SA-10U Command Vehicle

SA-10U Command Vehicle


Reliable troop command and control, which is achieved via navigation and communications facilities is crucial for effective combat operations. According to NATO standards, the coordination of all units and receipt of operational up-to-date information on allies and targets are the cornerstones of modern military operations. One such element is satellite navigation means which are being developed and mass-produced by “Orizon Navigation”. The products of this state-owned enterprise are installed on all planes, ships, tanks and other armored vehicles, and are also included in the serviceman’s personal protection system. In 2018, the enterprise supplied more than 500 such systems and facilities.
SA-10U Command Vehicle

SA-10U Command Vehicle


The SA-10U, which is completely protected from the enemy means of electronic warfare, uses a variety of communication channels, including satellite. The product has passed all interdepartmental tests and, since 2016, has been accepted for service by the Armed Forces of Ukraine, and can also be used by other military formations and security agencies of the state. Three-fourths of SA-10U components were developed and manufactured by “Impulse”, while the rest of components were manufactured by EU member states and other countries, leaders in modern technology.

Hesco RAID

Hesco RAID

Hesco RAID is the result of 15 years of design and engineering, to reinvent a significant life-saving product used by the military, to save even more. Halving transportation requirements, minimizing the manpower needed to successfully deploy, and providing cover at a speed never seen before. RAID raises personnel protection to a new level, facing the evolving changes of overseas conflict, border security, and perimeter protection, head-on.

Hesco RAID

Hesco RAID


The Rapid in-theatre Deployment (RAID) has a purposely designed release mechanism so pre-joined standard or recoverable MIL units can be quickly deployed. RAID can curve and easily form corners in your defensive barriers so you can completely protect your perimeter. Some or all of the container can be dispensed in one continuous stream. For the units that you don’t deploy, simply lock the container and it will be secure. Additional units can be joined to create vast boundary walls with controlled entry points, to ensure you have complete protection.
Hesco RAID

Hesco RAID


RAID reduces the logistical burden of protecting expeditionary operations. Preparation is easy, RAID doesn’t require foundations or concrete and can be securely surface-mounted. There are no pallets and no plastic wrapping which means no waste to clean up.RAID requires 50% less road traffic to deliver. The specially designed and engineered ISO containers conform to ISO stacking and transportation standards. This makes RAID quicker and easier to transport.

Yuma Proving Ground

Yuma Proving Ground

Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) is a United States Army proving ground and one of the largest military installations in the world. It is a subordinate command of the Army Test and Evaluation Command. Featuring six airfields, nearly 2,000 miles of restricted airspace, 240 miles of road courses, and one of the longest overland artillery ranges in the nation, Yuma Test Center is the Army’s center for testing nearly every item in the ground combat arsenal. Weapon systems tested include artillery and mortars, armored vehicles, helicopters and unmanned aircraft, cargo and personnel air drop systems, countermeasures to the threat of roadside bombs, and much more. Located in southwestern La Paz County and western Yuma County in southwestern Arizona, U.S., about 30 miles (48 km) north-east of the city of Yuma, it encompasses 1,307.8 square miles (3,387.2 km²) in the northwestern Sonoran Desert.

 Yuma Test Center's Ground Combat Systems test-fires a M109A6 Paladin

Yuma Test Center’s Ground Combat Systems test-fires a M109A6 Paladin


The proving ground conducts tests on nearly every weapon in the ground combat arsenal. Nearly all the long-range artillery testing for U.S. ground forces takes place here in an area almost completely removed from urban encroachment and noise concerns. Restricted airspace controlled by the test center amounts to over 2,000 square miles (5,000 km2). Yuma Proving Ground has the longest overland artillery range (40 miles or 64 kilometres) in the nation, the most highly instrumented helicopter armament test range in the Department of Defense, over 200 miles (300 km) of improved road courses for testing tracked and wheeled military vehicles, over 600 miles (1,000 km) of fiber-optic cable linking test locations, and the most modern mine and demolitions test facility in the western hemisphere. Realistic villages and road networks representing urban areas in Southwest Asia have been constructed and are used for testing counter-measures to the threat of roadside bombs.
 Royal Danish Army Piranha V Infantry Fighting Vehicle conducts testing at Yuma Proving Ground

Royal Danish Army Piranha V Infantry Fighting Vehicle conducts testing at Yuma Proving Ground


The General Motors Desert Proving Ground – Yuma opened at the proving ground in late July 2009. General Motors built the facility at a cost of more than $100 million after closing its desert automotive test facility in Mesa, Arizona, that had been in operation since 1953. The new facility allows Army automotive testers to test their wheeled vehicles all year-round. It is estimated that the track can be used to test about 80 percent of the Army’s wheeled vehicle fleet. More than 3,000 people, mostly civilians, work at the proving ground, which is the largest employer in Yuma County. In a typical year, over 500,000 artillery, mortar and missile rounds are fired, 36,000 parachute drops take place, 200,000 miles (320,000 km) are driven on military vehicles, and over 4,000 air sorties are flown from the proving ground’s Laguna Army Airfield. About 10 percent of the proving ground’s workload is training. In a typical year, dozens of units come to the facility for realistic desert training, especially before deploying overseas.
Marines prepare to breach a building during a mock helicopter raid at Yuma Proving Ground

Marines prepare to breach a building during a mock helicopter raid at Yuma Proving Ground


Yuma Proving Ground’s clean air, low humidity, skimpy rainfall—only about 3 inches (76 mm) per year—and annual average of 350 sunny days, add up to almost perfect testing and training conditions. Urban encroachment and noise concerns are nonexistent problems, unlike at many other military installations. Of the four extreme natural environments recognized as critical in the testing of military equipment, three fall under the management authority of Yuma Proving Ground. Realistic natural environment testing ensures that American military equipment performs as advertised, wherever deployed around the world. The proving ground manages military equipment and munitions testing at three locations: The Cold Regions Test Center at Fort Greely, Alaska; the Tropic Regions Test Center operating in Panama, Honduras, Suriname, and Hawaii; and at the Yuma Test Center located at Yuma Proving Ground. The common link between these test centers is “environmental testing,” which makes the proving ground the Army’s environmental test expert.
U.S. Army testing of the Joint Air-to-Ground Missile (JAGM) via an AH-64 Apache Longbow at Cibola Range, Yuma Proving Ground

U.S. Army testing of the Joint Air-to-Ground Missile (JAGM) via an AH-64 Apache Longbow at Cibola Range, Yuma Proving Ground


Since its early days, Yuma Proving Ground has been a desert environmental test center for all types of military equipment and materiel. However, developmental and a variety of other types of testing of artillery systems and ammunition, aircraft armament and targeting systems, mobility equipment, and air delivery systems, not necessarily desert environmental-related, now comprise the bulk of the workload. Yuma Proving Ground tests improvised explosive devices, commonly known as IEDs, the number-one killer of American service men and women in Iraq and Afghanistan. Hundreds of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles fly at the proving ground each year from the six airfields located at the proving ground, as do helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft conducting personnel and cargo parachute drops. A heavy investment in technology and a highly skilled soldier-civilian workforce makes the proving ground a significant social and economic component of the local community. Many friendly foreign nations take advantage of the test center’s excellent facilities and highly skilled workforce.

Hellhound Light Reconnaissance Vehicle

Hellhound Light Reconnaissance Vehicle

The Hellhound is a s six-passenger Hellhound Light Reconnaissance Vehicle produced by Northrop Grumman. The vehicle was designed from the ground up with the crew and mission in mind so that it could be used by light infantry, border police, National Guard or first responders. This particular variant is designed for the US Army’s light reconnaissance vehicle acquisition program, something the service says it’s serious about acquiring in the near term as part of its Combat Vehicle Modernization Strategy.

Hellhound Light Reconnaissance Vehicle

Hellhound Light Reconnaissance Vehicle


The Northrop Grumman’s Hellhound can generate electrical power for radios, sensors or other devices. For example, it can produces five times more electriciy than a M2 Bradley. Northrop is using a modular energy system in the vehicle from German company JENOPTIK, which produces systems capable of generating 120 kilowatts of “exportable, stable power. This capability makes laser weapons possible, and Northrop Grumman is already designing a 10 kW solid-state fiber laser weapon capable of shooting small UAVs. That’s enough power to run the LN270 nav system and other vehicle’s sensors, including a visible-light camera that can spot objects some 800 meters away, and an infrared sensor effective out to 10,000 meters.
Hellhound Light Reconnaissance Vehicle

Hellhound Light Reconnaissance Vehicle


The Hellhound has a weight of 6.5 ton, a rear engine and can carry up to six equipped soldiers, including the driver. The vehicle mounts a 30 mm ATK M230LF cannon on a EOS Technologies R-400 remote weapon station. The weapon “provides light vehicles with unprecedented access to firepower normally reserved for much heavier vehicles. Heavy protection has been sacrified in order to keep the Hellhound light enough to be carried by air, in platforms such as the CH-47 Chinook.

Huron MICO - Machine Gunners Assault Pack

Huron MICO – Machine Gunners Assault Pack

Huron MICO - Machine Gunners Assault Pack

Huron MICO – Machine Gunners Assault Pack


The Huron MICO (HRN-MICO) is a Light and Heavy Machine Gunners Assault Pack is outfitted with a custom lightweight feed chute, cover and weapons feed attachment. The main body pack is equipped with adjustable waist belt and shoulder straps. The Huron MICO is designed to carry 500 rounds of belted 7.62 ammo with 75 rounds in the chute connecting the backpack to the weapon.The weapons sling attaches to the MICO frame to enable ease and mobility.
Huron MICO - Machine Gunners Assault Pack

Huron MICO – Machine Gunners Assault Pack


Features:
• 7.62 or 5.56 Caliber (Adapter Sold Separately)
• Light and Heavy Machine Gunners Assault Pack
• Main body pack with adjustable waist belt
• Custom lightweight feed chute and cover
• Weapons feed attachment [Weapons Adapter is not included]
• Wt: 16 lbs. 3 oz. without ammunition
• Attachments available for Mark 46, Mark 48, M240, M249

Scorpion Ammunition Belt Storage and Feeding Backpack System

Scorpion Ammunition Belt Storage and Feeding Backpack System

Video have been circulating on youtube of a Russian Spetsnaz soldier apparently testing out a PKM heavy machine gun with an unusual backpack style ammunition belt storage and feeding system called Scorpion. The system developed, patented and manufacture by Russian company Front Tactical Systems. Scorpion system allows the machine gunners to carry more ammunition and at the same time have all the ammunition readily available, without a need to reload. Russian special forces requested such a feeding system a long time ago and the FRONT finally came up with a solution.

Scorpion Ammunition Belt Storage and Feeding Backpack System

Scorpion Ammunition Belt Storage and Feeding Backpack System


The system holds 550 rounds of 7.62x54R ammunition on standard PKM non-disintegrating belts. The main backpack compartment contains 475 rounds and there are additional 75 rounds in the feeding arm. The ammunition is held in a metal case which is then placed inside the backpack. So if the backpack gets damaged, the mentioned case can be placed inside any other backpack with similar dimensions. Scorpion’s backpack has the following dimensions: 18″x12″x4″.
Scorpion Ammunition Belt Storage and Feeding Backpack System

Scorpion Ammunition Belt Storage and Feeding Backpack System


The feeding arm is made of a high strength steel with a special anti-corrosion coating. It is pretty long (5.25 feet (160 cm)), which makes weapon manipulations relatively easy with the system attached. The feeding arm attaches to the ammunition can attachment bracket on PK type machine guns.
The backpack and feeding arm cover come in many color and camouflage options: black, tan, OD green, coyote brown, foliage green, ACU etc. The setup is straight out of Predator, and is similar to a backpack-fed machine gun rigged by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Vincent Winkowski in 2011 during a 2 1/2 hour firefight in Afghanistan.
Scorpion Ammunition Belt Storage and Feeding Backpack System

Scorpion Ammunition Belt Storage and Feeding Backpack System


The Russian PKP Pencheneg machine gun is nearly four feet long and fires 7.62x54mm ammo at 600-800 RPM. It is a further development and modification of the PK machine gun.[14] It is said to be more accurate than all its predecessors due to a heavier, non-removable, forced-air-cooling barrel with radial cooling ribs and a handle which eliminates the haze effect from hot gases and keeps the barrel cooler, making the weapon more reliable. Furthermore, the weapon is capable of having a telescopic sight or other sights mounted on it, which increases its accuracy and effective range.