Category Archives: Aerial Warfare

Russia deploys new Peresvet Ground-Based Laser Weapon

Russia deploys new Peresvet Ground-Based Laser Weapon


The Russian Defense Ministry have released stunning video footage of Peresvet combat laser systems entering test service, shedding a bit more light on the cutting-edge weapon. A short one-minute video shows the laser system “getting on test duty” outside Teikovo, a town west of Moscow. The system slowly comes out of a hangar and ejects a barrel-shape device, presumably a laser lens. The camera then quickly films Peresvet’s control room and an operator handling the system by remote control.

Russia deploys new Peresvet Ground-Based Laser Weapon

Russia deploys new Peresvet Ground-Based Laser Weapon


The Peresvet, also known as Russian Mobile Laser Weapon, is a new high energy laser weapon system unveiled by President Putin on March 1, 2018. The laser weapon system was already operational within the Russian Army but has not received an official military designation yet. The name was chosen by Russian citizens after a round of online voting. Alexander Peresvet was “a famous warrior monk who fought at the 1380 Battle of Kulikovo, which ended the Mongol domination of medieval Russia. The most likely use of this weapon is to counter unmanned air vehicles (UAV), cruise missiles and other low speed aircraft flying at low altitude. The laser beam is generated at the end of the carrier vehicle which features a sort of steerable laser cannon.
Russia deploys new Peresvet Ground-Based Laser Weapon

Russia deploys new Peresvet Ground-Based Laser Weapon


No further details were released about this weapon but the laser system itself may be powered by a small nuclear powerplant similar to the one used on the Poseidon nuclear torpedo and the Burevestnik global cruise missile. In July 2018 the new details emerged about the Peresvet purpose which may consist on blinding electro-optical sensors onboard surveillance Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites and unmanned aircraft. The Peresvet is being deployed on Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles (ICBM) within Russian territory. In the event of an ICBM launch the laser system might be employed to blind space based assets from registering the launch. Besides, the system can be employed to engage the guidance system of several types of missiles that are based upon image matching to identify their targets.
Russia deploys new Peresvet Ground-Based Laser Weapon

Russia deploys new Peresvet Ground-Based Laser Weapon


Russia’s Army has received its first laser combat weapon. The Peresvet high-energy laser weapon was declared operational on December 1, 2018. Key details about the laser, including its power and even purpose are still a mystery, with Moscow declaring it is “not time yet” for details. Peresvet firing units began being delivered to Russian Army units in 2017. The weapons appear trailer-mounted, normally concealed inside an armored shroud. The system looks similar to the U.S. Navy’s Laser Weapon System (LaWS) which went to sea on the warship USS Ponce in 2017.

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U.S. Navy to activate first CMV-22B tilt-rotor aircraft squadron

U.S. Navy to activate first CMV-22B tilt-rotor aircraft squadron

The U.S. Navy on Monday announced it held a ceremony to establish of its first squadron of CMV-22B tilt-rotor cargo aircraft, starting the transition from the C-2A Greyhound carrier onboard delivery (COD) aircraft. The Titans of Fleet Logistics Multi-Mission Squadron (VRM) 30 was officially established at a Dec. 14 ceremony at Naval Base Coronado. It is part of the Navy’s transition away from the venerable C-2A Greyhound naval transportation planes designed for resupply of aircraft carriers. The Navy says that compared to the C-2A Greyhound, the CMV-22B has an increased range, more cargo capacity, enhanced beyond-line-of-sight communications, and offers quicker cargo loading and unloading, according to the Navy.

VRM-30 is the Navys first CMV-22B Opsrey squadron and was established to begin the Navys transition from the C-2A Greyhound.

VRM-30 is the Navys first CMV-22B Opsrey squadron and was established to begin the Navys transition from the C-2A Greyhound.


“Where no instructions existed, no patch existed, no ‘here’s how we are going to perform our duties everyday’ existed, this team will define that,” Vice Adm. DeWolfe H. Miller III, commander of naval air forces, said in a statement. “And it’s exciting because we can establish right off the bat those best practices.” “This platform is our future and when you look at the nature of the future fight, we need that versatility, that flexibility that’s going to be provided in every subsequent squadron that transitions.”
Artist’s concept of CVM-22s in flight. Bell-Boeing Image

Artist’s concept of CVM-22s in flight. Bell-Boeing Image


In October, U.S. Navy officials announced they had sped up the transition to CMV-22B as the fleet’s COD. The first three CMV-22B aircraft are now expected to deploy in 2021, according to the Navy. The retirement of the U.S. Navy’s last C-2A Greyhounds is now scheduled to occur in 2024, about three years earlier than the previously announced 2027 retirement. The VRM-30 squadron will be training with Marine Corps pilot’s experienced with the V-22 airframe in the meantime. The CMV-22B will be used by the US Navy for transportation of special warfare teams, mail and cargo from shore to its aircraft carriers, as well as for shore or sea-based combat search-and-rescue (CSAR) missions.
A CV-22 of 8th Special Operations Squadron

A CV-22 of 8th Special Operations Squadron


The CMV-22B Osprey long-range tiltrotor aircraft is the US Navy’s future variant of MV-22B Osprey assault support aircraft developed by Bell Boeing for the US Marine Corps. The V-22 Osprey is the primary assault support aircraft of the U.S. Marine Corps. It has a unique design that uses twin rotor engines for vertical take-off and landing that can be tilted forward for conventional turboprop flight, allowing much higher speed and endurance than conventional helicopters. Bell Boeing Joint Program Office was awarded a contract to manufacture 39 CMV-22B aircraft for the US Navy in July 2018, under a $4bn modification to the V-22 tiltrotor aircraft advance acquisition contract.