Category Archives: Aerial Warfare

BAMSE SRSAM Ground Based Missile System

BAMSE SRSAM Ground Based Missile System

The BAMSE SRSAM system is one of few systems in the world today that is developed and optimised as a de­dicated Ground-Based Air Defence (GBAD) missile system. The RBS 23, designated BAMSE, is a Swedish medium range, all-weather capable air defense system developed by Bofors and Ericsson Microwave Systems (now both in the Saab group). BAMSE SRSAM is designed for flexible usage both for stand-alone operation as well as in networks with other sensors and weapon systems. The philosophy is to optimise system effect by having a number of fully co-ordinated firing units that together create a ground coverage for the system of more than 2,100 km2 and an effective altitude coverage of 15,000 m. The BAMSE SRSAM system has excellent built-in ECCM capabilities both in the GIRAFFE AMB surveillance radar and the unique monopulse Fire Control Radar (FCR) Automatic Command to Line Of Sight (ACLOS) missile guidance function.

BAMSE SRSAM Ground Based Missile System

BAMSE SRSAM Ground Based Missile System


The BAMSE system is a state of the art system with several unique capabilities. The system has been developed for a conscript Army with the strong requirement for easy operation and maintenance. The BAMSE system has extensive Built in Test Equipment (BITE), which minimises the need for special test equipment. The BAMSE system is also developed to have high redundancy where every single missile launcher has the capability to combat targets without any connection to an external information source or higher command.The BAMSE system has unique high altitude coverage and is effective with maintained high missile manoeuvrability at 15,000 m altitude. Every single missile launcher has C2 capabilities. BAMSE has high survivability with ballistic protection on every missile launcher and outstanding ECCM capabilities. The BAMSE system has the possibility to have integrated IFF on every missile launcher in order to further strengthen the possibility to act as autonomous units, if necessary. The system has been specially developed to combat small and fast targets as well as low flying cruise missiles and UAVs.
BAMSE SRSAM Ground Based Missile System

BAMSE SRSAM Ground Based Missile System


The system consists of a Surveillance and Control Centre (SCC) and two to four Missile Control Centers (MCC). The missile control center trailers are located up to 20 km away from the SCC and interconnected via a cable or radio communications (up to 15 km). The SCC is operated by a crew of one or two. It comprises an Ericsson GIRAFFE Radar 3D surveillance radar with an antenna mast of 8 to 13 meters. It is used for threat evaluation, combat coordination, with target acquisition, identification, tracking and prioritisation. The SCC can coordinate up to four missile control centres. The system has a built-in simulation capability to carry out training. The missile control center trailer depends on transportation vehicles which also carry additional missiles for reloading operations. The center is protected against fragments and nuclear, biological and chemical threats. It has two computer stations and is operated by one or two persons. It comprises a Ka-band fire control radar with an 8 meters mast, IRST (infrared sensor for surveillance and tracking), IFF system, six ready-to-fire BAMSE missiles, and weather sensors. The MCC can be deployed in 10 minutes and complete reload of a MCC takes less than 4 minutes. The missile used by the RBS 23 system is based on the RBS 70, but unlike its predecessor (which is laser beam rider) it is a radar command control ACLOS missile, which means that the missile itself and the target have to be tracked by the fire control radar until impact. A booster has been added also. The missile is claimed to have high acceleration and high manoeuvrability. It is equipped with a fragmentation and shaped charge warhead and with both a proximity fuse and an impact fuse. Range is 20 km.
BAMSE SRSAM Ground Based Missile System

BAMSE SRSAM Ground Based Missile System


To successfully meet threat scenarios, the BAMSE system has been provided with all vital capabilities for defeating the present threat and that of the foreseeable future with the following unique capabilities:

  • Optimised situational awarenes
  • A large number of SHORADS can be connected
  • Freedom of deployment due to elevated platforms
    Short deployment time; a complete battery is combat- ready in less than lOmin
  • Short reloading time; all six missiles in less than 5 min
    Flexible system, several MCCs controlled by one GIRAFFE AMB
  • Embedded simulator in every unit
  • Maintenance-free missiles
  • Extensive BITE for every unit and a simplified maintenance concept
  • Long servicable life and Low Life Cycle Cost (LCC)
  • Optional C-RAM warning capability
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CH-53E Super Stallion Successfully Recovers AH-1Z Viper

CH-53E Super Stallion Successfully Recovers AH-1Z Viper

A CH-53E Super Stallion aircraft with Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 465, a UH-1Y Venom aircraft with Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 267 and Marines from the 3rd Marine Logistics Group execute a Tactical Recovery of Aircraft and Personnel Mission, recovering an AH-1Z Viper helicopter from W-174 Joint Okinawa Training Range Complex on Feb. 11, 2019. The complex is located on Idesuna Jima, an uninhabited island off the coast of Okinawa, Japan.

CH-53E Super Stallion Successfully Recovers AH-1Z Viper

CH-53E Super Stallion Successfully Recovers AH-1Z Viper


TRAP, a unique capability of the Marine Corps CH-53E Super Stallion, demonstrates 1st Marine Aircraft Wing’s ability to provide a relevant, robust, and flexible capability when conducting personnel and aircraft recovery. A Marine Corps mission performed by an assigned and briefed aircrew for the specific purpose of the recovery of personnel, equipment, and/or aircraft when the tactical situation precludes search and rescue assets from responding and when survivors and their location have been confirmed.
CH-53E Super Stallion Successfully Recovers AH-1Z Viper

CH-53E Super Stallion Successfully Recovers AH-1Z Viper


Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 465 (HMH-465) is a United States Marine Corps helicopter squadron consisting of CH-53E Super Stallion transport helicopters. The squadron, known as “Warhorse”, is based at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, California and falls under the command of Marine Aircraft Group 16 (MAG-16) and the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing (3rd MAW).

(U.S. Marine Corps video by Cpl. Alexia Lythos and Cpl. Dakota Heathwarr)
Interviews in order of appearance: Capt. Valerie Smith, CH-53E pilot, Sgt. Joseph Desmond, CH-53E crew chief and Capt. Sean Charvet, CH-53E Pilot, all with HMH-465.

Northrop Grumman MQ-4C Triton

Northrop Grumman MQ-4C Triton

The Northrop Grumman MQ-4C Triton is an American high-altitude long endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) under development for the United States Navy as a surveillance aircraft. In tandem with its associated ground control station, it is considered an unmanned aircraft system (UAS). Developed under the Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) program, the system is intended to provide real-time intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions (ISR) over vast ocean and coastal regions, continuous maritime surveillance, conduct search and rescue missions, and to complement the Boeing P-8 Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft. Triton builds on elements of the RQ-4 Global Hawk; changes include reinforcements to the air frame and wing, de-icing systems, and lightning protection systems. These capabilities allow the aircraft to descend through cloud layers to gain a closer view of ships and other targets at sea when needed. The current sensor suites allow ships to be tracked over time by gathering information on their speed, location, and classification.

Northrop Grumman MQ-4C Triton

Northrop Grumman MQ-4C Triton


The MQ-4C can remain aloft more than 30 hours at 55,000 ft (17,000 m) at speeds of up to 330 knots (380 mph; 610 km/h). Its surveillance sensor is the AN/ZPY-3 Multi-Function Active Sensor (MFAS) X-band AESA radar with a 360-degree field-of-regard, capable of surveying 2,700,000 sq mi (7,000,000 km2) of sea (as well as shoreline or land) in a 24 hour period, or 2,000 sq mi (5,200 km2) in a single sweep. Using the radar in inverse synthetic aperture mode, the MFAS can identify a target in all weather conditions. It can take high definition radar pictures, then use the advanced image and radar return recognition software of the onboard Automatic Identification System (AIS) to classify it without the intervention of aircraft operators. The Triton is semi-autonomous to conserve manpower, so operators only need to choose an operating area for the aircraft, and set speed, altitude, and objective rather than operating controls. One thing the Triton was designed to do (that the Global Hawk cannot) is rapidly descend to lower altitudes. It is built with a more robust lower fuselage to withstand hail, bird, and lightning strikes. It is equipped with anti-icing systems on its wings. At low altitude, the Triton would use its Raytheon MTS-B multi-spectral EO/IR sensor (also used on the MQ-9 Reaper) which is equipped with additional laser designator, pointer, and range finding abilities capable of automatically tracking what the MFAS detects. The optical suite can stream live video to ground forces.
Northrop Grumman MQ-4C Triton

Northrop Grumman MQ-4C Triton


The Triton is equipped with a modular electronic support measures (ESM) suite, similar to the one used on the Lockheed EP-3, to passively detect and classify faint radar signals. It is able to triangulate and geo-locate these signals, allowing mission planners to create an enemy “electronic order of battle” profile, or keep the aircraft and others outside the range of enemy radars and air defenses. Detecting and locating the source of radar signals would also be useful for locating military vessels at sea for potential targeting. Low- and high-band signals receivers to give it a multi-INT (SIGINT) capability will be fielded in 2021 as part of an integrated functional capability (IFC) 4 configuration; further changes are planned for IFC 5 upgrade in 2024. Another aspect of the MQ-4C is its ability to act as a network relay and data fusion center, able to receive and transmit messages from around a theater of operations between various sources not within line-of-sight of each other. It can take what ships, planes, and land sensors are seeing and broadcasting through various data-links and fuse that information together to create a common “picture” of the battlespace, which it can rebroadcast. This capability greatly increases interoperability, situational awareness, targeting efficiency, and sensor picture clarity, while providing an alternative to satellite-based communications systems.
Northrop Grumman MQ-4C Triton

Northrop Grumman MQ-4C Triton

The U.S. Navy began considering in September 2014 cutting the number of Tritons it plans to buy. The intention has been to have twenty operational MQ-4C aircraft operational at any one time, with the rest of the sixty-eight-plane order force being spares. Due to the improved reliability of the aircraft, budget pressures may require the Navy to trim the numbers of aircraft it will order. In September 2015, the DoD Inspector General found the seventy-aircraft force requirement justified, based on available attrition rate estimates of four per 100,000 hours. The Navy intends to begin operation of one operating location every year starting in 2018 until there are five. Four Tritons will be operational at each base to maintain continuous flight, with the rest produced for testing, training, and loss replacement; the entire order is to be completed in 2032. Australia has considered the MQ-4, both as a military platform and as customs enforcement platform; senior customs officials have doubted the effectiveness of the planned seven MQ-4C to detect small boats in the country’s northern waters, especially through cloud cover. On 26 June 2018, Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull announced the purchase of the first of six MQ-4C Tritons with consideration being given to purchase a seventh. In January 2015, the German Luftwaffe and Bundeswehr began considering the Triton to fill their signals intelligence (SIGINT) needs as a continuation of the cancelled Global Hawk-based EuroHawk program. The German Defence Ministry confirmed in March 2017 that it had decided to buy the MQ-4C to replace the EuroHawk program, with deliveries occurring after 2025. Northrop Grumman has also proposed the MQ-4C to India; the Indian Navy have considered the UAV in a complementary role to the twelve Boeing P-8I Poseidons maritime patrol aircraft it has on order.

Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirit

Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirit

The Northrop (later Northrop Grumman) B-2 Spirit, also known as the Stealth Bomber, is an American heavy strategic bomber, featuring low observable stealth technology designed for penetrating dense anti-aircraft defenses; it is a flying wing design with a crew of two.[1][4] The bomber can deploy both conventional and thermonuclear weapons, such as eighty 500-pound class (230 kg) Mk 82 JDAM Global Positioning System-guided bombs, or sixteen 2,400-pound (1,100 kg) B83 nuclear bombs. The B-2 is the only acknowledged aircraft that can carry large air-to-surface standoff weapons in a stealth configuration.

Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirit

Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirit


Development started under the “Advanced Technology Bomber” (ATB) project during the Carter administration; its expected performance was one of his reasons for the cancellation of the supersonic B-1A bomber. The ATB project continued during the Reagan administration, but worries about delays in its introduction led to the reinstatement of the B-1 program. Program costs rose throughout development. Designed and manufactured by Northrop, later Northrop Grumman, the cost of each aircraft averaged US$737 million (in 1997 dollars). Total procurement costs averaged $929 million per aircraft, which includes spare parts, equipment, retrofitting, and software support. The total program cost, which included development, engineering and testing, averaged $2.1 billion per aircraft in 1997.

Because of its considerable capital and operating costs, the project was controversial in the U.S. Congress. The winding-down of the Cold War in the latter portion of the 1980s dramatically reduced the need for the aircraft, which was designed with the intention of penetrating Soviet airspace and attacking high-value targets. During the late 1980s and 1990s, Congress slashed plans to purchase 132 bombers to 21. In 2008, a B-2 was destroyed in a crash shortly after takeoff, though the crew ejected safely. Twenty B-2s are in service with the United States Air Force, which plans to operate them until 2032.

Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirit

Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirit


The B-2 is capable of all-altitude attack missions up to 50,000 feet (15,000 m), with a range of more than 6,000 nautical miles (6,900 mi; 11,000 km) on internal fuel and over 10,000 nautical miles (12,000 mi; 19,000 km) with one midair refueling. It entered service in 1997 as the second aircraft designed to have advanced stealth technology after the Lockheed F-117 Nighthawk attack aircraft. Though designed originally as primarily a nuclear bomber, the B-2 was first used in combat dropping conventional, non-nuclear ordnance in the Kosovo War in 1999. It later served in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Libya.

Patriots Jet Team

Patriots Jet Team

The Patriots Jet Team is a civilian aerobatic formation team that performs in air shows across the western United States of America. The team currently operates as a six-ship team, flying the Czech-built Aero L-39 Albatros. The Patriots are based in Byron, California. The team is owned by former United Airlines pilot Randy Howell It is sponsored by companies including Hot Line Construction, Inc. and supported by a ground crew of more than 25 volunteers. The Patriots Jet Team, the largest civilian-owned aerobatic jet team in the western hemisphere.

Patriots Jet Team

Patriots Jet Team


This mission hit the ground running in 1999, when the first of the Patriots aircraft were purchased, followed by additional jets in 2004, 2005, and 2011. The team began flying demonstrations in 2003 with just two L-39 aircraft. The aircraft were disassembled in Europe, shipped via truck, rail, and sea in containers to the United States. In the 2004 airshow season a third L-39 was added. With the success of the 2005 season, the Patriots added a fourth jet for the 2006 season. In 2010, the Patriots Jet Team expanded to a six-ship aerobatic formation team.
Patriots Jet Team

Patriots Jet Team


The talented group of pilots was first assembled in 2002 by Howell. Based in Byron, CA, the Patriots Jet Team features pilots who were formerly part of the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds and U.S. Navy Blue Angels. They have logged over 105,000 hours of flight time and performed in more than 1500 air shows. The volunteer pilots all share the same genuine passion to entertain audiences at air shows and other events, while also encouraging the nation’s youth toward careers in the aviation and aerospace fields.
Patriots Jet Team

Patriots Jet Team


In the summer of 2012, the Patriots Jet Team moved into the 35,000 square foot Jet and Event Center. This facility enables the team to house all seven jets as well as two MiG-17s under one roof, and still have plenty of room to spare. Equally important is that the skilled mechanics team can now perform maintenance at the same location. Additionally, the hangar has become a favorite hangout for aviation enthusiasts of all ages. The state-of-the-art facility is also home to the Patriots Jet Team Foundation, and youngsters come from all over to attend science and aviation classes.

Royal New Zealand Air Force NH90 Medium Military Helicopter

There are eight NH90 helicopters in the Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) fleet. It has the capability to support ground operations, disaster relief, search and rescue, counter-drug operations and counter terrorism. Police, Customs, Maritime NZ, Civil Defence, Foreign Affairs and Trade, NZAID and the Department of Conservation are able to make effective use of the NH90. NH90 can carry up to 12 fully equipped soldiers or up to 18 lightly equipped troops (allowing for door gunners). It can carry up to 9 stretchers plus medical staff or palletised cargo; it can also lift the Army’s Light Operational Vehicle.

Royal New Zealand Air Force NH90 Medium Military Helicopter

Royal New Zealand Air Force NH90 Medium Military Helicopter


In 2006, the New Zealand government signed a NZ$771 million (~€500M) contract to purchase eight NH90s (plus one extra for spares) to replace the Royal New Zealand Air Force’s (RNZAF) fleet of 13 UH-1 Iroquois helicopters. For ease of manufacture and logistics, New Zealand deliberately chose their NH90 configuration to be nearly identical to the larger Australian fleet. On 7 December 2011, deliveries to New Zealand formally began with the first two NH90s being airlifted by a leased Antonov An-124 cargo aircraft to RNZAF Base Ohakea. In February 2013, the first phase of the RNZAF’s operational evaluation of the NH90 was completed, clearing the type to begin operational duties.
Royal New Zealand Air Force NH90 Medium Military Helicopter

Royal New Zealand Air Force NH90 Medium Military Helicopter


Between September 2013 and July 2014, the first four delivered NH90s were retrofitted to a final operational configuration; later aircraft were already delivered to this standard.[119] On 31 October 2014, the RNZAF announced that they had received into service the last of the eight NH90 TTHs.[118] Following command structure changes in December 2014, the NH90 fleet was tasked with additional responsibilities, including casualty evacuation during search and rescue operations and providing transport services to the New Zealand Police and other government personnel.
Royal New Zealand Air Force NH90 Medium Military Helicopter

Royal New Zealand Air Force NH90 Medium Military Helicopter


The NHIndustries NH90 is a medium-sized, twin-engine, multi-role military helicopter. It was developed in response to NATO requirements for a battlefield helicopter which would also be capable of being operated in naval environments. The NH90 was developed and is manufactured by NHIndustries, a collaborative company, which is owned by Airbus Helicopters, Leonardo (formerly AgustaWestland) and Fokker Aerostructures. The first prototype conducted its maiden flight in December 1995; the type first entered operational service in 2007. The NHIndustries NH90 has logged 127,000 flight hours in the armed forces of thirteen nations.

Boeing awarded $87.5 million for work on T/AV-8B Harrier II trainer

Boeing awarded $87.5 million for work on T/AV-8B Harrier II trainer

Boeing was awarded two contracts worth $87.5 million to development, upgrades and support of the U.S. Marines’ T/AV-8B Harrier II trainer aircraft. The contracts for the two-seat trainer version of the AV-8B Harrier aircraft include engineering and avionics upgrades, according to U.S. Department of Defense. The contracts, announced Friday by the Department of Defense, includes to provide engineering and integrated logistics support to maintain the T/AV-8B Harrier during the aircraft’s post-production support phase.

T/AV-8B Harrier II trainer

T/AV-8B Harrier II trainer


Seventy-five percent of the work will be performed at the company’s plant in St. Louis with 11 percent in Warton, Lancashire, United Kingdom; 10 percent in Cherry Point, N.C.; 3 percent in Yuma, Ariz. and 1 percent in Philadelphia. Work is expected to be completed in December 2023. Funds will be obligated on individual delivery orders as they are issued. Work on another contract, worth $16.2 million, will be performed in St. Louis and is expected to be completed in March 2024. The contract is for system configuration set updates, avionics and weapons integration, as well as avionics obsolescence mitigation. Naval fiscal 2018 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $2 million will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year.
T/AV-8B Harrier II trainer

T/AV-8B Harrier II trainer


T/AV-8B Harrier II is a two-seat trainer version of the AV-8B Harrier aircraft. AV-8B Harrier II is a ground-attack aircraft that constitutes the second generation of the Harrier Jump Jet family. Capable of vertical or short takeoff and landing (V/STOL), the aircraft was designed in the late 1970s as an Anglo-American development of the British Hawker Siddeley Harrier, the first operational V/STOL aircraft. McDonnell Douglas, which was later acquired by Boeing, first produced the AV-8B aircraft in 1981. A Harrier II Plus initially flew in 1992. Production ended in 2003. In 2007, Boeing signed a $258.5 million performance-based logistics contract to support AV-8B Harriers operated by the U.S. Marine Corps, Italy and Spain. The fixed-wing plane can take off vertically, as well as zoom out of the range of enemy fire extremely quickly, making “it one of the most maneuverable combat aircraft in service,” according to Boeing.