Category Archives: Ground Warfare

General Dynamics Ordnance and Tactical Systems Awarded Contract for 155mm XM1113 Rocket-Assisted Projectile Round

GD-OTS awarded contract for 155mm XM1113 Rocket-Assisted Projectile (RAP) Round

The Combat Capabilities Development Command – Armaments Center (CCDC-AC) and the Joint Program Executive Office Armaments and Ammunition at Picatinny Arsenal have awarded General Dynamics Ordnance and Tactical Systems (GD-OTS) a contract valued at $15 million for Prototype and Process Development for the 155mm XM1113 Rocket-Assisted Projectile (RAP) round. GD-OTS is partnered with American Ordnance, Nammo-Talley, and SAVIT in the United States; and is working with Thales Australia to expand the international Supply Chain, enabling the U.S. Government to make the system available to overseas customers.

The XM1113 RAP uses rocket technology to deliver greater thrust to the round, when compared to its predecessor, the legacy M549A1. This will enable current U.S. Field Artillery 155mm Systems to fire the XM1113 RAP to a range of 40 kilometers, a 30% increase from the M549A1. When fired from the planned future Extended Range Artillery Cannon (ERCA), the XM1113 will achieve ranges out to 70 kilometers. The XM1113 RAP round aligns with the U.S. Army’s modernization initiative under the Long Range Precision Fires (LRPF) Cross-Functional Team.

General Dynamics Ordnance and Tactical Systems Awarded Contract for 155mm XM1113 Rocket-Assisted Projectile Round

General Dynamics Ordnance and Tactical Systems Awarded Contract for 155mm XM1113 Rocket-Assisted Projectile Round


“The XM1113 RAP brings enhanced performance to the battlefield, increasing lethality and extending range for the cannon artillery warfighter. We are proud to support the U.S. Army’s modernization initiatives to provide overmatch capability to the warfighter; and look forward to meeting the operational needs of our international allies” said Jason Gaines, Vice President and General Manager of Munition Systems at General Dynamics Ordnance and Tactical Systems.

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Japan Ground Self Defense Force Howitzer first on Australian soil

Japan Ground Self Defense Force Howitzer first on Australian soil

The Japan Ground Self Defense Force (JGSDF) fired its FH-70 Howitzers out to 25 kilometres for the very first time while on Exercise Southern Jackaroo with the Australian Army at Shoalwater Bay Training Area in May 2019. The JGSDF conducted the long range shoot in Australia as there isn’t a military range large enough to shoot to that distance in Japan. Australian Army soldiers from 7th Brigade helped facilitate the live fire activity and were honoured to be part of this historic moment for the JGSDF.

Japan Ground Self Defense Force (JGSDF) fired its FH-70 Howitzers out to 25 kilometres

Japan Ground Self Defense Force (JGSDF) fired its FH-70 Howitzers out to 25 kilometres


The exercise also saw integration opportunities between Japanese artillery soldiers and 1st Regiment, Royal Australian Artillery during live fire practices. Exercise Southern Jackaroo is a trilateral field training activity between the Australian Army’s 7th Brigade, Japan Ground Self Defense Force and the United States Marine Rotation Force – Darwin, which aims to enhance interoperability, increase rapport and improve joint tactical, administrative and logistical operations.
Japan Ground Self Defense Force (JGSDF) fired its FH-70 Howitzers out to 25 kilometres

Japan Ground Self Defense Force (JGSDF) fired its FH-70 Howitzers out to 25 kilometres


The FH70 (field howitzer for the 1970s) is a towed howitzer in use with several nations. The barrel was 39 calibres long, giving 827 m/s standard maximum muzzle velocity. It had a muzzle brake giving 32% efficiency. The shell with the same shape and dimensions as the US M549 rocket-assisted projectile. The standard HE shell is a thin wall design weighing 43.5 kg and containing 11.3 kg of HE. The propellant system comprises three different bagged cartridges with triple-base propellant. The Japan Ground Self Defense Force (JGSDF) FH-70 Howitzers Built under license with the ordnance by Japan Steel Works, also used in a Japanese SPG design.

TsNIItochmash unveils Lotus self-propelled howitzer prototype

TsNIItochmash unveils Lotus self-propelled howitzer prototype

Russia’s Central Research Institute of Precision Machine-Building (TsNIITochMash) unveiled a prototype of the CAO 2С42 Lotus 120mm self-propelled artillery system for the Russian Airborne Troops. The General public self-propelled gunwill be shown at the International military-technical forum “Army-2019”, the press service of Russia’s state-owned Rostec corporation. Lotos is fully equipped and is ready to operate in manual mode. All components passed entrance checks by the technical control department and the military. The next stage would be to develop the software that will allow the gun to operate with a high degree of autonomy, said the industrial Director of Rostec Sergey Abramov.

TsNIItochmash unveils Lotus self-propelled howitzer prototype

TsNIItochmash unveils Lotus self-propelled howitzer prototype


The CAO 2С42 Lotos (Lotus) is a 120mm self-propelled gun based on the BDM-4M designed by the Research Institute of Precision Machine Building (TsNIITochMash) and intended as the replacement for airborne 120-mm self-propelled artillery-setting mortar 2S9 “Nona” and its modifications. Compared with its predecessor the new gun will feature extended range and increased accuracy through the use of high precision ammunition. the Lotus has a maximum firing range of 13 km, a rate of fire of 6-8 shots per minute, can be converted to and from firing position in 30 seconds, and features new high-precision ammunition. The nimble system is believed to weigh of 18 tonnes, have a maximum speed of 70 km per hour, and to have a crew of four. The first Lotos prototype is expected to be built in 2017.

Streit Group Salamander AFSV 8x8 amphibious armored vehicle

Streit Group Salamander AFSV 8×8 amphibious armored vehicle

Streit Group, the world’s largest privately-owned vehicle armouring company unveils a new 8×8 amphibious armored vehicle dubbed Salamander AFSV at IDEX 2019 in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Salamander AFSV 8×8 Armored vehicle can be deployed for various missions, peace keeping operations and convoy escort. Impressive power and handling makes the SALAMANDER-8×8 equally suited to urban and off-road deployment. The vehicle is designed to carry passengers and cargo on hard-surface roads, dirt tracks, off road and cross wet gaps.

Streit Group Salamander AFSV 8x8 amphibious armored vehicle

Streit Group Salamander AFSV 8×8 amphibious armored vehicle


The design of the Salamander is very unique with the crew, troop’s compartment and engine at the rear with a low profile silhouette. There is two large bulletproof windows at the front. The troops can enter and leave the vehicle from one door located on each side of the hull. The Salamander is motorized with a Kamaz 8.9 Turbo Diesel engine coupled to a 8 speed manual transmission. This vehicle is fully amphibious and propelled in the water at a maximum speed of 10 km/h by a single water jet mounted at the rear of the hull.
Streit Group Salamander AFSV 8x8 amphibious armored vehicle

Streit Group Salamander AFSV 8×8 amphibious armored vehicle


The Salamander has a crew of two and the rear part of the hull can accommodate 8 troops. The roof of the vehicle can be fitted with different type of weapon station. The vehicle showed at IDEX was fitted with one remotely operated weapon station armed with one 7.62mm machine gun. The Salamander can be protected up to Level 3 STANAG 4569 to provide protection against firing of small arms 7.62mm caliber at a range of 30m and blast of 8 kg mine explosion under the wheels and the body of the vehicle (mines protected front (STANAG Level 3) and back (STANAG Level 2)) .

Northrop Grumman Delivers First IBCS Mobile Command Center

Northrop Grumman Delivers First IBCS Mobile Command Center

Northrop Grumman Corporation has delivered to the U.S. Army the first production-representative engagement operations center (EOC) for the Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) Battle Command System (IBCS). The delivered IBCS EOC has completed all functional configuration audits for major configuration items and system verification review, and is representative of the production configuration for hardware and software that will undergo qualification testing before IOT&E. Northrop Grumman is on pace to deliver 11 EOCs and 18 IFCN relays for the IBCS program by the end of the year.

Northrop Grumman Corporation Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) Battle Command System

Northrop Grumman Corporation Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) Battle Command System


“This milestone is testament of the significant progress toward operational capability that will make pivotal differences to warfighters, commanders and acquisition officials,” said Dan Verwiel, vice president and general manager, missile defense and protective systems, Northrop Grumman. “We will be delivering more EOCs as well as IBCS integrated fire control network (IFCN) relays in the near future. These articles will be used for initial operational test and evaluation (IOT&E), which informs future production decisions.” “Northrop Grumman will continue to closely collaborate with our customer and user communities to realize the groundbreaking vision of IBCS and its transformative impact on the air and missile defense mission,” said Verwiel.
Northrop Grumman Corporation Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) Battle Command System

Northrop Grumman Corporation Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) Battle Command System


IBCS is a paradigm shift for IAMD by replacing legacy stove-piped systems with a next-generation, net-centric approach to better address an evolving array of threats. The system integrates disparate radars and weapons to construct a far more effective IAMD enterprise. IBCS delivers a single integrated air picture with unprecedented accuracy as well as broader surveillance and protection areas. With its truly open systems architecture, IBCS allows incorporation of current and future sensors and effectors and enables interoperability with joint C2 and the ballistic missile defense system. IBCS is managed by the U.S. Army Program Executive Office for Missiles and Space, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama.

South Korea completes development Anti-Aircraft Gun Wheeled (AAGW)

South Korea completes development Anti-Aircraft Gun Wheeled (AAGW)

South Korea has completed development of a new 30 mm wheeled self-propelled anti-aircraft gun (SPAAG) system based on 8×8 armoured vehicle. This system, dubbed Anti-Aircraft Gun Wheeled (AAGW) by its manufacturer, began development in June, 2015 with budget of 55 billion won (approximately $46.6 million) as replacement for aging Vulcan Air Defense System. The AAGW consists of modified Hanwha Defense K30 Biho turret and Hyundai Rotem K808 chassis. The country’s Defence Acquisition Programme Administration (DAPA) announced on 5 June that the system, development of which began in 2015, has successfully met all the requirements set by the South Korean military following final tests and evaluations. A new wheeled SPAAG might supplement the tracked K30 Biho SPAAG.

South Korea Anti-Aircraft Gun Wheeled (AAGW)

South Korea Anti-Aircraft Gun Wheeled (AAGW)


Developed by Hanwha for the Republic of Korea Army (RoKA), search radar from the original K30 Biho has been removed. Instead, it maintains wired and wireless datalink with TPS-880K Local Air Defense Radar (LADR) and Air Defense Command & Control Alert (ADC2A) Network. The use of existing proven technology and platform significantly reduced development time and cost as well. AAGW is equipped with an Electro Optical Targeting System (EOTS), which has 7 km detection range and 3 km engagement range, and back up manual targeting sight. The original Biho’s license-produced Raytheon EOTS was replaced in favor of the new Hanwha Systems EOTS, which has a built-in IRST feature and is 1/3 the size of the preceding model. The AAGW makes localized support and self-targeting functionalities possible through electron optical targeting systems and visual targeting systems.
South Korea Anti-Aircraft Gun Wheeled (AAGW)

South Korea Anti-Aircraft Gun Wheeled (AAGW)


Vehicle has a crew of three, including commander, gunner and driver, however manufacturer suggests, that it can accommodate more operators. Driver is seated towards the front on the right side, with the diesel power pack to the left. Commander and gunner are seated in the turret. Vehicle is fitted with Hyundai diesel engine, developing 420 hp. The KW2 has an automatic driveline management system. It has a central tyre inflation system, which is adjusted from the drivers station, and is fitted with run-flat tyres. This artillery system has an all-welded armored hull. It provides protection against small arms fire and artillery shell splinters. Vehicle can be fitted with add-on armor for a higher level of protection. It is also equipped with NBC protection system.
South Korea K30 Biho (Flying Tiger) Self-Propelled Anti-Aircraft Gun

South Korea K30 Biho (Flying Tiger) Self-Propelled Anti-Aircraft Gun


The Purpose of the development of Anti-Aircraft Gun Wheeled vehicle system was to defend allied forces’ points of interests, as well as defend friendly mobile troops, from low-altitude attacks by enemy aircrafts. The number of required personnel for self-propelled anti-aircraft gun (SPAAG) operation was reduced from 48 to 18 per company and the system boats 95% localization rate. This is crucial as the Republic of Korea Army will have much fewer personnel in the near future. The AAGW based on the chassis of the Hyundai Rotem K808 8×8 armoured vehicle is said to be much cheaper than the tracked K30 Biho, and the Korean Army currently plans to acquire approximately 270 systems. The AAGW will further enhance the Republic of Korea Army’s low-altitude-air-defense capability against low-flying aircraft and drones.
South Korea K808 Armored Personnel Carrier

South Korea K808 Armored Personnel Carrier

German Army completes European SPIKE LR firing campaign

German Army completes European SPIKE LR firing campaign

The German army has finalized its annual training in firing of Rafael’s SPIKE LR ATGM missile. Spike long-range (LR) missile, designated by the Bundeswehr as the Mehrrollenfähige Leichte Lenkflugkörpersystem (Multirole-capable Light Anti-tank Missile System: MELLS). The firing was performed in Germany under adverse weather conditions, and included the firing of as many as 54 live SPIKE LR missiles by German Army gunners from the new SPIKE ICLU launchers (Integrated Control Lunch Unit), which includes a new digital user interface. During the training, German personnel launched SPIKE LR missiles in complex firing scenarios, including engagements in BLOS (Beyond-Line-of-Sight: targets hidden behind cover), retargeting midflight scenarios, firing in total darkness in IR (infrared) mode, as well as firing in day mode under harsh conditions of intense rain and strong winds. Both launchers and gunners performed flawlessly and all 54 missiles hit their targets successfully.

Eurospike SPIKE LR ATGM

Eurospike SPIKE LR ATGM


The SPIKE LR is a 5th generation precision guided missile system designed for the modern warfare with multiplatform, multipurpose capabilities including F&F / Fire, observe and update capabilities as well as abilities of third party target allocation (launch to grid coordinates in no line of sight) based on an internal IMU. The SPIKE LR2 light weight, enhanced lethality and great standoff of 5.5 (ground) to 10 (air) km makes it the ideal munition for infantry as well as light attack helicopters. The SPIKE LR2 was originally designed to be launched by the existing 29 nations SPIKE LR launchers. SPIKE is in production in Europe by EUROSPIKE, through major EU defence OEM‘s as well as numerous EU SME‘s and is already integrated and qualified to a large variety of terrestrial and aerial EU armed forces platforms, including armored vehicles, attack helicopters and naval vessels. Their lofted trajectories enable the warhead to strike the target at its most vulnerable location with pinpoint precision. All of the SPIKE Family members have a low life-cycle cost, due to high reliability and operational, logistic support and production commonality between members.
Eurospike SPIKE LR ATGM

Eurospike SPIKE LR ATGM


SPIKE missile family is an Israeli fire-and-forget anti-tank guided missile and anti-personnel missile with a tandem-charge HEAT warhead, currently in its fourth-generation. It was developed and designed by the Israeli company Rafael Advanced Defense Systems. It is available in man-portable, vehicle-launched, and helicopter-launched variants. As well as engaging and destroying targets within the line-of-sight of the launcher (“fire-and-forget”), some variants of the missile are capable of making a top attack profile through a “fire, observe and update” guidance method (essentially lock-on after launch (LOAL)); the operator tracking the target, or switching to another target, optically through the trailing fiber-optic wire (or RF link in the case of the vehicle-mounted, long-range NLOS variant) while the missile is climbing to altitude after launch. SPIKE missile family sold to 31 countries around the world, with over 30,000 missiles supplied, consists of missiles suited for land, air and naval platforms, multiple ranges and a variety of targets.This is similar to the lofted trajectory flight profile of the US FGM-148 Javelin.