Littoral Combat Ship 17 (Indianapolis) Completes Acceptance Trials

Littoral Combat Ship 17 (Indianapolis) Completes Acceptance Trials

Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) 17, the future USS Indianapolis, completed Acceptance Trials in Lake Michigan. This is the ship’s final significant milestone before the ship is delivered to the U.S. Navy. LCS 17 is the ninth Freedom-variant LCS designed and built by the Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT)-led industry team and is slated for delivery to the Navy this year. “LCS 17 is joining the second-largest class of ships in the U.S. Navy fleet, and we are proud to get the newest Littoral Combat Ship one step closer to delivery,” said Joe DePietro, Lockheed Martin vice president and general manager, Small Combatants and Ship Systems. “This ship is lethal and flexible, and we are confident that she will capably serve critical U.S. Navy missions today and in future.”

Littoral Combat Ship 17 (Indianapolis) Completes Acceptance Trials

Littoral Combat Ship 17 (Indianapolis) Completes Acceptance Trials


Unique among combat ships, LCS is designed to complete close-to-shore missions and is a growing and relevant part of the Navy’s fleet.
It is flexible — with 40 percent of the hull easily reconfigurable, LCS can be modified to integrate capabilities including over-the-horizon missiles, advanced electronic warfare systems and decoys.
It is fast — capable of speeds in excess of 40 knots.
It is lethal — standard equipped with Rolling Airframe Missiles (RAM) and a Mark 110 gun, capable of firing 220 rounds per minute.
It is automated — with the most efficient staffing of any combat ship.
The trials included a full-power run, maneuverability testing, and surface and air detect-to-engage demonstrations of the ship’s combat system. Major systems and features were demonstrated, including aviation support, small boat launch handling and recovery and machinery control and automation.
Littoral Combat Ship 17 (Indianapolis) Completes Acceptance Trials

Littoral Combat Ship 17 (Indianapolis) Completes Acceptance Trials


Headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs approximately 100,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. This year the company received three Edison Awards for ground-breaking innovations in autonomy, satellite technology and directed energy. Fincantieri is the leading western shipbuilder with a rich history dating back more than 230 years, and a track record of building more than 7,000 ships. Fincantieri Marine Group is the American subsidiary of Fincantieri, and operates three Great Lakes Shipyards: Fincantieri Marinette Marine, Fincantieri Bay Shipbuilding, and Fincantieri ACE Marine. Fincantieri Marine Group’s more than 2,100 steelworkers, craftsman, engineers and technicians in the United States specialize in the design, construction and maintenance of merchant ships and government vessels, including for the United States Navy and Coast Guard.

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Plasan StormRider Light Armored Vehicles

Plasan StormRider Light Armored Vehicles

The new StormRider is the latest member of the SandCat FoV and is built around the same rugged Ford components. The StormRider is engineered as a fully structural Monocoque, doing away with a ladder-frame chassis – 4×4 Tactical Armored Vehicles, Independent Suspensions & CTIS, 2a/2b Mine Protection and STANAG Level II/III all-round protection and provides increased payload capacity including AWD with Differential Locks integrated militarycapabilities. First launched in 2005, the SandCat has evolved into a broad Family of Vehicles, fielded in over 16 countries across 5 continents. Now joining the range is the StormRider models, the first new vehicles which are based on Plasan’s 4th generation SandCat architecture.

Plasan StormRider Light Armored Vehicles

Plasan StormRider Light Armored Vehicles


The new armored floor design achieves a higher level of underbelly mine protection without paying the usual price in weight and height. The StormRider maintains the SandCat’s compact dimensions, easy access 5-door design, with a new Independent suspensions, All-wheel-Drive and integrated CTIS for caring 10 soldiers with uncompromised 4×4 Tactical Mobility for a sub-12t GVW. Peripheral protection is modular and can be configured between STANAG 2 and STANAG 3 (or equivalent) subject to payload requirements. Firing ports permit the crew to fire their weapons from the safety of the protected cabin and the interior is designed to accommodate many different communications systems and other equipment. Two-zone air-conditioning is standard and options include independent heater, NBC filtration, Fire-Suppression Systems, situational awareness systems and either manual or remote-controlled roof-mounted weapons.
Plasan StormRider Light Armored Vehicles

Plasan StormRider Light Armored Vehicles


New heavy-duty door-handles open the doors with an ease unheard of on armored vehicles. Inside, dual combat-locks ensure that the doors stay safely closed, even after a blast event. Floating floors, footpads, and eight Energy Attenuating (EA) blast seats protect the occupants and even more importantly keep them comfortable over long missions. The SandCat’s distinctive glass shapes are optimized for field of view and light weight. In fact the entire design is the result of optimizing geometry and materials to maximize space, payload, and protection, and minimize weight. The interior is well-insulated and spacious, designed specifically to accept integration of any equipment a user could need.
Plasan StormRider Light Armored Vehicles

Plasan StormRider Light Armored Vehicles


In the new variants you will find Plasan’s Past Experience in “Kitted-Hull” Combat Proven Integrated Survivability Systems (ISS) at all protection levelsdefense and automotive systems withcomprehensiveknowledge of worldwide industry and military standards and regulations. Plasan’s “Kitted Hull” Design is ideal for local production and Transfer of Technology (ToT) to Latin America local industry – Manufacturing, Assembly, Integration, Maintenance and Service. The SandCat M-LPV and StormRider are built on the heritage of the only original SandCat. More than ever, the SandCat gets you to your mission, and brings you safely home.

AFSOC U-28A Draco Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance Aircraft

AFSOC U-28A “Draco” Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance Aircraft

After more than 13 years in service, the U-28A Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) aircraft officially received approval in May for the naming convention of “Draco” (Draco is the Latin term for dragon). The mission of the Draco is to provide manned fixed-wing tactical airborne ISR support to humanitarian operations, search and rescue, conventional and special operations missions. The U-28A is a modified, single-engine Pilatus PC-12 that operates worldwide. The initial block of U-28 aircraft were procured and modified for use in Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. The aircraft is crewed by 3, pilot, co-pilot and Combat System Officer (CSO).

AFSOC U-28A Draco Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance Aircraft

AFSOC U-28A Draco Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance Aircraft


The U-28A fleet evolved from commercially available aircraft that were purchased and then modified with communications gear, aircraft survivability equipment, electro-optical sensors, and advanced navigation systems. The advanced radio-communications suite is capable of establishing DoD/NATO data-links, full-motion video, data, and voice communications. One of the U-28A roles is the insertion, extraction and resupply of Special Operations Forces (SOF). The single-engine U-28A is small enough to land on small grass or dirt airstrips. It can carry 10 passengers or 3,000lbs of cargo and can operate from the type of short, unimproved airstrip that a larger plane, such as the C-130 Hercules, would be too big and heavy for.
AFSOC U-28A Draco Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance Aircraft

AFSOC U-28A Draco Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance Aircraft


Special Operations Command mission requirements generated a need for small numbers of mission specific aircraft which were procured rapidly to address specific mission needs. The Non-Standard Aircraft (NSAv) fleet is a general program term and encompasses several light and medium aircraft performing utility missions for SOCOM. Overall the NSAv mobility fleet untethers special operations forces from robust infrastructures, extended timelines and allows freedom of movement. The U-28A Draco is an integral part of AFSOC’s Non-standard light tactical fixed wing aircraft fleet, and is operated by the 319th and 34th Special Operations Squadrons, training is conducted by the 5th and 19th SOS; all squadrons are located at Hurlburt Field, Fla.

LCM-1E Amphibious Mechanized Landing Craft

LCM-1E Amphibious Mechanized Landing Craft

The LCM-1E is a class of amphibious mechanized landing craft manufactured by Navantia at their factory in San Fernando. These craft are intended to deliver troops and equipment onshore from amphibious assault ships during amphibious assaults. The craft are operated by the Spanish Navy and the Royal Australian Navy (the latter referring to the vessels as LHD Landing Craft or LLC), and have been ordered by the Turkish Navy. In 1999, a contract for the construction of two prototypes landing craft (L-601 and L-602), for evaluation and testing in different conditions was signed. These craft would replace the LCM-8s in Spanish Navy service. After undergoing trials, 12 additional units were ordered to service the two Galicia-class landing platform dock ships (Galicia and Castilla) and the amphibious assault ship Juan Carlos I.

LCM-1E Amphibious Mechanized Landing Craft

LCM-1E Amphibious Mechanized Landing Craft


The landing craft have the ability to operate over-the-horizon, as they are equipped with radar navigation, GPS, gyro needle/magnetic compasses and HF communications equipment, VHF and UHF. This allows them to operate up to 20 nautical miles (37 km; 23 mi) from their mothership. Propulsion is supplied by two MAN D-2842 LE 402X diesel engines, which supply 809 kilowatts (1,085 hp) each to the two waterjets, allowing the craft to reach 22 knots (41 km/h; 25 mph) unladen, and 13.5 knots (25.0 km/h; 15.5 mph) loaded. Maximum range at economical speeds is 190 nautical miles (350 km; 220 mi). The LCM-1E incorporates a stern gate, allowing the loading and unloading of vehicles onto all landing craft within the dry stern dock, without having to open the gate to swap landing craft around. In turn, this saves having to dock down the landing platform, and allows re-stowing of vehicles while the landing platform is underway. There is a maximum limit of 12 tons for the transfer of vehicles in this configuration.
LCM-1E Amphibious Mechanized Landing Craft

LCM-1E Amphibious Mechanized Landing Craft


In 2009, the Australian Defence Force began plans to acquire landing craft for the under-construction Canberra-class landing helicopter dock ships. Arrangements were made to acquire craft from Navantia (the builder responsible for the LHDs), and in September 2011, the purchase of 12 LCM-1E craft was approved by the Australian government. The landing craft were delivered in batches of four: the first batch in May 2014, followed by the second in February 2015, with the third due by mid-2015. In Australian service, the craft are referred to as LLCs (LHD Landing Craft), and six are assigned to each of the Canberra-class ships: four embarked, two assigned to shore facilities for training and trials, and rotated aboard as embarked craft require maintenance. On 29 December 2013, the Turkish Navy selected Navantia to work with local partner Sedef to build a ship based on Juan Carlos I, along with four landing craft LCM-1E.

Airbus Helicopter Joint Light Helicopter

Airbus Helicopter Joint Light Helicopter

The Joint Light Helicopter (hélicoptère interarmées léger – HIL) programme was approved by the French state to meet two objectives: to replace the five fleets of helicopters that are in service in all three branches of the French armed forces; and to implement overall improvements to maintaining the fleet in operational condition (maintien en condition opérationnelle – MCO). The French Minister of the Armed Forces, Florence Parly, has announced that the launch of the Joint Light Helicopter programme has been brought forward to 2021. The helicopter was also given its official name and will be designated as “Guépard” (“Cheetah”) by the French Armed Forces.

Airbus Helicopter Joint Light Helicopter

Airbus Helicopter Joint Light Helicopter


Weaponised and furnished for light attack operations, the H160M can quickly be reconfigured to perform missions ranging from commando infiltration to air intercept, fire support, and anti-ship warfare; up to two stretchers for search and rescue operations; as well as a fast rope system, cargo hook, and hoist that can equally be used for parapublic missions—a versatile, all-in-one asset for modern militaries. The H160 was designed to be a modular helicopter with a single platform, to perform missions ranging from commando infiltration to air intercept, fire support, and anti-ship warfare in order to meet the needs of the army, the navy and the air force through the HIL programme.
Airbus Helicopter Joint Light Helicopter

Airbus Helicopter Joint Light Helicopter


The first of a new generation of helicopter, the H160M derives from the EASA-certified H160. It benefits from a low cost of operations and optimised flight safety. The H160M incorporates the latest technological achievements in French aeronautics. To ensure a high level of availability while reducing operating costs, the H160M’s support and services needs were taken into account from early in its design phase. Innovative and simplified, the H160M’s support is based on the exploitation of data through analytics. In addition, the H160M can be integrated into a secured digital support environment.
Airbus Helicopter Joint Light Helicopter

Airbus Helicopter Joint Light Helicopter


In its army aviation role, the H160M is the perfect complement to an air-land force, reconnaissance, special forces operations, and Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence (C4I) operations. As a naval asset, the H160M is a formidable addition to anti-surface warfare, naval force protection, maritime security, maritime environment monitoring and intelligence, and search and rescue. The H160M’s power, range and equipment options make it an ideal aircraft for missions involving national airspace protection and search and rescue.

Honeywell F124 Turbofan Engine

Honeywell F124 Turbofan Engine

The Honeywell/ITEC F124 is a low-bypass turbofan engine derived from the civilian Honeywell TFE731. The F125 is an afterburning version of the engine. The engine began development in the late 1970s for the Republic of China (Taiwan) Air Force AIDC F-CK Indigenous Defence Fighter (IDF), and it first ran in 1979. The F124/F125 engine has since been proposed for use on other aircraft, such as the T-45 Goshawk and the SEPECAT Jaguar, and currently powers the Aero L-159 Alca and the Alenia Aermacchi M-346. The F124 has a rather unusual design for a two spool gas turbine engine, using both axial and centrifugal compressors in its high-pressure compressor. There are currently only three production variants of the engine, although several more have been proposed throughout its lifespan.

AIDC F-CK-1 Ching-kuo

AIDC F-CK-1 Ching-kuo


The Honeywell F124 turbofan engine has what it takes to power today’s most advanced military jet trainers and light combat fighters – maximum performance, reliability and availability. No wonder the F124 was Leonardo DRS’ choice to power the T-100 trainer, the company’s entry in the U.S. Air Force T-X trainer competition. The engine already flies on the Leonardo M346 Master, the most advanced military trainer in service, and on a variety of other light fighters and unmanned vehicles. In all, the F124/F125 family of engines has more than 1 million operating hours to its credit. The F124 has the highest thrust-to-weight ratio in its class, thanks to a unique single-stage design that maximizes engine performance.
Aero L-159 Alca

Aero L-159 Alca


The F124 engine is fundamentally a low bypass, two spool engine (meaning that there are two rotational shafts, a high-pressure shaft and a low-pressure shaft). The fan/low-pressure compressor section is made of three stages with titanium blades. The first stage has 30 un-shrouded blades,and the overall pressure ratio for the three stage fan section is 2.5:1. Some of the air is bypassed (Bypass ratio of 0.472:1), and the rest is fed to the high-pressure compressor section.The high-pressure compressor (HPC) of the F124 is a fairly unusual design among turbofan engines; it employs both axial and a centrifugal compressors in a single design. There are four axial stages that lead to a fifth centrifugal stage. All the blades and the impeller are made from titanium.
Alenia Aermacchi M-346 Master

Alenia Aermacchi M-346 Master


The engine features advanced Full Authority Digital Electronic Control (FADEC) and an integrated Engine Monitoring System (EMS) to keep tabs on engine health, monitor usage and streamline troubleshooting. Modular design makes the engine faster and easier to repair, enabling maintenance teams to put training instructors and student pilots where they belong, back in the air, quickly and efficiently. Safety is paramount in the flight training world and the T-100 provides an additional safety margin by using two F124 engines. The F124 offers all this and more, backed by the global resources of Honeywell and a reputation earned in producing some of the world’s best turbine engines over more than six decades.

Hamza 6x6 MCV Armoured Vehicle

Hamza 6×6 MCV Armoured Vehicle

The Hamza 6×6 MCV is a new Modular Design Multi-Role combat vehicle, fully designed and developed by the Pakistani Company Cavalier Group to response to the new needs of Pakistani army. The vehicle can accommodate a total of 13 military personnel including driver, commander and gunner. The Hamza can be fitted with a full range of weapon system including small turret or remote weapon station which can be armed with machine gun or automatic cannon up to 30 mm caliber. The vehicle is motorized with a Cummins ISM 500 6 cylinders Turbo Charged and Intercooled diesel engine coupled to an Allison 6 speed automatic transmission. The vehicle can run at a maximum road speed of 110 km with a maximum cruising range of 500 km

Hamza 6x6 MCV Armoured Vehicle

Hamza 6×6 MCV Armoured Vehicle


The vehicle features a V-shaped wall monocoque armored hull design and offers advanced protection features and superior off-road mobility and can operate in urban, mountainous and difficult rural terrains. The hull of the HAMZA 6×6 provides standard protection Level 4 STANAG 4569, with ballistic protection against firing of small arms 14.5 mm caliber and mine blast of 10 kg of TNT under the wheels. The vehicle can be fitted with an armour package to increase the protection to Level 5 STANAG 4569. The HAMZA 6×6 has a combat weight from 20 to 22 tons with a payload capacity of 7 tons maximum.
Hamza 6x6 MCV Armoured Vehicle

Hamza 6×6 MCV Armoured Vehicle


The Cavalier Energy and Defence Systems Group is a fully integrated group dealing primarily in the Energy, Defence and Information Technology sectors. The comprises of three major divisions, the Energy Division and the Defence Systems Division. The group was established in 2001, is ISO 9001:2008 certified and registered with all major Defence Institutions and Energy Sector Departments. The group draws on the technical, commercial and project management abilities of over 200 staff members spanning over five locations across the globe including United Kingdom, United States of America, China and United Arab Emirates.