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Royal Canadian Navy HCNS William Hall Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship Commissioned Into Service

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Royal Canadian Navy HCNS William Hall Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship Commissioned Into Service

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Royal Canadian Navy HCNS William Hall Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship Commissioned Into Service
Royal Canadian Navy HCNS William Hall Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship Commissioned Into Service

The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) welcomed His Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) William Hall into naval service with a commissioning ceremony in Halifax, N.S. today. As the fourth Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship for the RCN, HMCS William Hall will strengthen the Navy’s ability to enforce sovereignty in Canadian waters, and to meet the future defence challenges in the North. Today’s commissioning of HMCS William Hall included a symbolic presentation of the commissioning pennant to the Commanding Officer, Commander Scott Kelemen, and the breaking (hoisted and flown) of the ship’s pennant at the same time as the ship’s ensign. A commissioning ceremony is a long-time naval tradition and a special event for the ship’s company, inducting the ship into the RCN fleet. After the completion of sea and port trials, the ship is ready to deploy and carry out its missions

“I join the Royal Canadian Navy in celebrating the commissioning of HMCS William Hall into Canada’s fleet. As we outlined in Our North, Strong and Free, protecting Canadian sovereignty is job number one for the Canadian Armed Forces – and these patrol vessels are an important capability that allows our Navy to fulfil this mission. As the security challenges facing Canada evolve rapidly, we are steadfastly committed to investing in the defence of our Arctic and North,” The Honorable Bill Blair, Minister of National Defence said

“The commissioning of a ship is a critical milestone, as it represents its official welcome into the Royal Canadian Navy and signifies that it is available for unrestricted service. I commend the tremendous dedication of the captain and crew of HMCS William Hall, who have successfully completed months of trials and training to be ready for this moment. Our fourth Arctic and Offshore Patrol Vessel now stands ready to protect our Arctic waters and Canada’s maritime interests,” Vice-Admiral Angus Topshee, Commander of the Royal Canadian Navy said.

“Today is a very exciting day for my ship’s crew. They have spent many months preparing the ship and readying themselves for the challenges ahead. A commissioning ceremony is a symbolic moment, and a once in a lifetime opportunity for many sailors. I am extremely proud of the crew that has brought HMCS William Hall into the Royal Canadian Navy fleet,” Commander Scott Kelemen, HMCS William Hall said.

, #HMCSWilliamHall became the fourth Harry DeWolf-class vessel to join our fleet
HMCS William Hall (AOPV 433) will be the fourth Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessel for the Royal Canadian Navy.

The Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessel was derived from the Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship project as part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy and is primarily designed for the patrol and support of Canada’s Arctic regions. Named after Quartermaster William Nelson Edward Hall, who was the first African Canadian to receive the Victoria Cross. He received the medal for his actions in the 1857 Siege of Lucknow during the Indian Rebellion. The Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessels are designed for use in the Arctic regions of Canada for patrol and support within Canada’s exclusive economic zone. The vessel is 103.6 m (339 ft 11 in) long overall with a beam of 19.0 m (62 ft 4 in). The ship will have a displacement of 6,615 metric tons (6,511 long tons). The ship has an enclosed foredeck that protects machinery and work spaces from Arctic climates.

The vessel will be powered by a diesel-electric system composed of four 3.6-megawatt (4,800 hp) MAN 6L32/44CR[4] four-stroke medium-speed diesel generators and two electric propulsion motors rated at 4.5 megawatts (6,000 hp) driving two shafts. William Hall will be capable of 17 knots (31 km/h; 20 mph) in open water and 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph) in 1-metre (3 ft 3 in) first-year sea ice. The ship will also be equipped with a bow thruster to aid during manoeuvres and docking procedures without requiring tugboat assistance. The ship will have a range of 6,800 nautical miles (12,600 km; 7,800 mi) and an endurance of 120 days with 65 personnel. William Hall will be equipped with fin stabilizers to decrease roll in open water but can be retracted during icebreaking.

William Hall will be able to deploy with multiple payloads, including shipping containers, underwater survey equipment or landing craft. Payload operations are aided by a 20-metric-ton (20-long-ton; 22-short-ton) crane for loading and unloading. The ship is equipped with a vehicle bay which can hold pickup trucks, all-terrain vehicles and snowmobiles. The ship will also have two 8.5-metre (27 ft 11 in) multi-role rescue boats capable of over 35 knots (65 km/h; 40 mph). The ship will be armed with one BAE Mk 38 25 mm (0.98 in) gun and two M2 Browning machine guns. The patrol ship has an onboard hangar and flight deck for helicopters up to the size of a Sikorsky CH-148 Cyclone. William Hall will have a complement of 65 and accommodation for 85 or 87.

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