HII Awarded 240 Million Advance Procurement Contract for Amphibious Transport Dock LPD 32
HII Awarded 240 Million Advance Procurement Contract for Amphibious Transport Dock LPD 32

HII Awarded 240 Million Advance Procurement Contract for Amphibious Transport Dock LPD 32

HII announced today that its Ingalls Shipbuilding division has received a $240 million, cost-plus-fixed-fee advance procurement contract from the U.S. Navy to provide long-lead-time material and advance construction activities for amphibious transport dock LPD 32. The ship will be the 16th in the San Antonio class constructed at Ingalls Shipbuilding. LPD 32 will be the third Flight II amphibious ship in the San Antonio class. LPD Flight II is the next generation amphibious ship to replace Whidbey Island (LSD 41) and Harpers Ferry (LSD 49) classes of dock landing ships. Ingalls has delivered 12 San Antonio-class ships to the U.S. Navy and has two more under construction, including Richard M. McCool Jr. (LPD 29) and Harrisburg (LPD 30). Fabrication of the 15th San Antonio-class ship, Pittsburgh (LPD 31), will begin later this year.

The San Antonio class is a class of amphibious transport docks, also called a “landing platform, dock” (LPD), used by the United States Navy. These warships replace the Austin-class LPDs (including Cleveland and Trenton sub-classes), as well as the Newport-class tank landing ships, and the Charleston-class amphibious cargo ships that have already been retired. Twelve ships of the San Antonio class were originally proposed, their original target price was $890 million; as built, their average cost is $1.6 billion. Defense Authorization for Fiscal Year 2015 included partial funding for the twelfth San Antonio-class ship. As of January 2018 eleven warships of this class are in service with the U.S. Navy with an additional two ships under construction or authorized.

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Aerial image of Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula, Mississippi.
Aerial image of HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding Division in Pascagoula, Mississippi.

On 2 August 2018, the U.S. Navy and Huntington Ingalls signed a contract for long lead items for LPD-30, the first of the 13-ship more affordable Flight II class. The contract was for US$165.5M. The cost goal is for US$1.64B for the first ship, and $1.4B for subsequent ships. LPD-30 will be fitted with a Raytheon AN/SPY-6 Enterprise Air Surveillance Radar, an upgrade over the AN/SPS-48 currently in LPD-17s. Huntington Ingalls will build the new flight exclusively. On 26 March 2019, Huntington Ingalls announced the award of a US$1.47 billion, fixed-price incentive contract for LPD 30 (14th ship and first of Flight II). On 3 April 2020, Huntington Ingalls announced that it was awarded a $1.5 billion contract modification for the construction of USS Pittsburgh, named for Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

“Our shipbuilders are proud to continue building these amphibious ships that are integral to the Navy fleet,” Ingalls Shipbuilding President Kari Wilkinson said. “The funds from this contract will be used to purchase long-lead time material and major equipment across a supplier network of nearly 400 companies in 30 states.”

HII is an all-domain defense and technologies partner, recognized worldwide as America’s largest shipbuilder. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and survivable naval ships ever built, to unmanned systems, ISR and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable an all-domain force. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong.

HII Awarded 240 Million Advance Procurement Contract for Amphibious Transport Dock LPD 32
ATLANTIC OCEAN (June 9, 2011) The amphibious transport dock ships USS San Antonio (LPD 17) and USS New York (LPD 21) are underway together in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Virginia. San Antonio is conducting ship handling drills with New York during San Antonio’s second phase of sea trials, which are primarily focused on combat systems testing and developing crew proficiency. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Edwin F. Bryan/Released)

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