US Navy Essex Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) Conduct Kuwait Training
US Navy Essex Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) Conduct Kuwait Training

US Navy Essex Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) Conduct Kuwait Training

Marines and Sailors from the Essex Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) and 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) are conducting sustainment training aboard multiple U.S. military installations and off the coast of Kuwait, Sep. 27. The exercise will enable the 11th MEU to train together as a Marine Air Ground Task Force (MAGTF) to sustain its proficiency in operating as a ready and capable response force while in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations.

The 11th MEU consists of the Command Element; the Aviation Combat Element comprised of Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 165 (Reinforced) and Marine Attack Squadron (VMA) 214; the Ground Combat Element comprised of Battalion Landing Team 1/1; and the Logistics Combat Element comprised of Combat Logistics Battalion 11. Essex ARG is comprised of amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2), amphibious transport dock USS Portland (LPD 27), and amphibious dock landing ship USS Pearl Harbor (LSD 52).

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The Essex ARG/11th MEU is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations in support of naval operations to ensure maritime stability and security in the Central Region, connecting the Mediterranean and the Pacific through the Western Indian Ocean and three strategic choke points. The ARG/MEU departed their home port of San Diego for a regularly scheduled deployment, Aug 12.

US Navy Essex Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) Conduct Kuwait Training
Boatswain’s Mate Seaman Anthony Lopuszanski, assigned to Assault Craft Unit 5, signals to a landing craft air cushion during sustainment training at Camp Gerber, Kuwait, Sept. 27. The Essex Amphibious Ready Group and the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit are deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations in support of naval operations to ensure maritime stability and security in the Central Region, connecting the Mediterranean and Pacific through the Western Indian Ocean and three strategic choke points. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Sgt. Jennessa Davey)
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