US Air Force Jolly Green II Helicopter Completes First Aerial Refueling
US Air Force Jolly Green II Helicopter Completes First Aerial Refueling

US Air Force Jolly Green II Helicopter Completes First Aerial Refueling


Approximately 3,000 feet above Eglin U.S. Air Force Base, the HH-60W Jolly Green II connected with a HC-130J tanker for the inaugural aerial refueling by the Air Force’s newest combat search and rescue helicopter, Aug. 5. The connection marked the start of two weeks of developmental testing of the aircraft’s aerial refueling abilities by 413th Flight Test Squadron testers and their mission partners. Throughout the tests, the aircrew and engineers will evaluate the helicopter’s ability to connect with the fuel drogue and its handling qualities during the fueling. They also monitor the functionality of the systems and gauges to ensure the aircraft receives the fuel appropriately with the proper pressures.
An HH-60W Jolly Green II prepares to connect with an HC-130J tanker for its first aerial refueling over southern Alabama, Aug. 5, 2020. The Air Force’s newest combat search and rescue helicopter is currently undergoing developmental and operational testing.
An HH-60W Jolly Green II prepares to connect with an HC-130J tanker for its first aerial refueling over southern Alabama, Aug. 5, 2020.(U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Tristan McIntire)

“This capability is essential for the CSAR mission since it greatly extends the operating range of the aircraft and thus allows the unit to extend their rescue capabilities over a larger battlespace,” said Joe Whiteaker, 413th FLTS Combat Rescue Helicopter flight chief.

Advertisement

“Our job is to evaluate how difficult aerial refueling will be for operational pilots and to identify any unforeseen hazards due to the unique configuration of the HH-60W, which may not have been present in the legacy HH-60G,” Whiteaker said.

“This is a critical test milestone for the program as it reinforces the superior capabilities of the HH-60W and its ability to support the Air Force’s CSAR mission,” said Greg Hames, Sikorsky Combat Rescue Helicopter program director.

An HH-60W Jolly Green II connects with an HC-130J tanker for its first aerial refueling over southern Alabama, Aug. 5, 2020.
An HH-60W Jolly Green II connects with an HC-130J tanker for its first aerial refueling over southern Alabama, Aug. 5, 2020. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Tristan McIntire)

Maj. Andrew Fama, 413th FLTS pilot, was the Air Force pilot for the refueling mission. He evaluated the handling qualities and made the first contacts. He and the aircrew spent extra time preparing for the mission that included talking through the test sequence and rehearsing the phraseology used during the refueling. It was that extra time spent that made for a smooth mission without issues. The aerial refueling mission marks yet another 2020 milestone for the HH-60W program. So far, the Jolly Green II has undergone radar, weather and defensive system testing to name a few. Early missions will be during daylight hours. Testing will conclude with a nighttime evaluation using night vision goggles.

Sikorsky HH-60W Jolly Green II Combat Rescue Helicopter
Sikorsky HH-60W Jolly Green II Combat Rescue Helicopter (Photo Lockheed Martin Corporation)

The U.S. Air Force named its newest combat rescue helicopter, the HH-60W, the “Jolly Green II,” following the legendary tradition of the Vietnam-era HH-3E Jolly Green and HH-53 Super Jolly Green crews who pioneered the combat search and rescue mission. The primary mission of the HH-60W helicopter will be conducting day or night combat search and rescue operations into hostile environments to recover isolated personnel during war. The HH-60W will also be tasked to perform military operations other than war, including civil search and rescue, medical evacuation, disaster response and NASA support. The U.S. Air Force plans to purchase up to 108 HH-60W helicopters to replace the HH-60G Pave Hawk.

 Sikorsky HH-60W Jolly Green II Combat Rescue Helicopter
Sikorsky HH-60W Jolly Green II Combat Rescue Helicopter (Photo Lockheed Martin Corporation)
Advertisement

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.