Raytheon to update Advanced Synthentic Aperture Radar for US Air Force U-2 Dragon Lady

Raytheon to update Advanced Synthentic Aperture Radar for US Air Force U-2 Dragon Lady

Raytheon announced on Monday the the ASARS-2B doubles the surveillance range while maintaining the mapping and imagery resolution of the current ASARS-2A system for U.S. Air Force. Raytheon signed a $320 million undefinitized contract to develop new version of the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar that flies on the U-2 Dragon Lady aircraft. ASARS-2B completed a flight test at Edwards Air Force Base in California earlier this year. The proposed radar will use active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar technology and support both land and sea missions. Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar System was developed in the early 1980s.

Raytheon to update Advanced Synthentic Aperture Radar for US Air Force U-2 Dragon Lady

Raytheon to update Advanced Synthentic Aperture Radar for US Air Force U-2 Dragon Lady


ASARS-2B allows the Dragon Lady to see doubles the surveillance range while maintaining the mapping and imagery resolution of the current ASARS-2A system. That kind of range is crucial for commanders to achieve decision superiority — and it ensures that the U-2 remains a preferred option for manned airborne surveillance operations. ASARS-2B’shigh-resolution, multimode, long-range, air-to-ground radar can provide critical intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance data. ASARS detects and precisely locates fixed and moving targets on the ground in all kinds of weather. The U-2 modularity allows the aircraft to adapt to different mission needs and “respond to emerging threats anywhere, anytime.
Raytheon to update Advanced Synthentic Aperture Radar for US Air Force U-2 Dragon Lady

Raytheon to update Advanced Synthentic Aperture Radar for US Air Force U-2 Dragon Lady


Lockheed U-2, nicknamed “Dragon Lady”, is an American single-jet engine, ultra-high altitude reconnaissance aircraft operated by the U.S. Air Force (USAF) and previously flown by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). With a range of 3,000 miles, it can carry up to 700 pounds of the latest photoreconnaissance equipment to altitude of 70,000 feet. Built from the profile of a traditional sailplane with a long-tapered wing, the plane was designed in the mid-1950s as reconnaissance on Soviet military activity. On July 4, 1956, Hervey Stockman flew a U-2 from Wiesbaden, West Germany, deep into the heart of the Soviet Union to detailed photos of airfields, factories and shipyards not possible by other aircraft.

Advertisements

Please leave your comments below!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.