US Navy Ohio-class Ballistic Missile Submarine USS Nevada (SSBN-733) Visits Guam
US Navy Ohio-class Ballistic Missile Submarine USS Nevada (SSBN-733) Visits Guam

US Navy Ohio-class Ballistic Missile Submarine USS Nevada (SSBN-733) Visits Guam

The U.S. Navy ballistic-missile submarine USS Nevada (SSBN 733) arrived at Apra Harbor, Guam Jan. 15. This port visit to Guam reflects the United States’ commitment to the Indo-Pacific region and complements the many exercises, operations, training, and military cooperation activities conducted by Strategic Forces to ensure they are available and ready to operate around the globe at any time. She was launched on 14 September 1985 and commissioned on 16 August 1986. USS Nevada, homeported in Naval Base Kitsap, Wash., is an Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarine.

USS Nevada (SSBN-733) is a United States Navy Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine that has been in commission since 1986. She is the fourth ship of the U.S. Navy to be named for Nevada, the 36th state. The Ohio class of nuclear-powered submarines includes the United States Navy’s 14 ballistic missile submarines (SSBNs) and its four cruise missile submarines (SSGNs). Each displacing 18,750 tons submerged, the Ohio-class boats are the largest submarines ever built for the U.S. Navy. They are the world’s third-largest submarines, behind the Russian Navy’s Soviet-designed 48,000-ton Typhoon class and 24,000-ton Borei class.

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USS Nevada is an Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarine, an undetectable launch platform for submarine-launched ballistic missiles, providing the United States with its most important survivable leg of the nuclear triad. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Darek Leary)
USS Nevada is an Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarine, an undetectable launch platform for submarine-launched ballistic missiles, providing the United States with its most important survivable leg of the nuclear triad. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Darek Leary)

The Ohio class’s design allows the boat to operate for about 15 years between major overhauls. These submarines are reported to be as quiet at their cruising speed of 20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph) although exact information remains classified. Fire control for their Mark 48 torpedoes is carried out by Mark 118 Mod 2 system, while the Missile Fire Control system is a Mark 98. Each SSBN submarine is armed with up to 24 Trident II submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBM). Each SSGN is capable of carrying 154 Tomahawk cruise missiles, plus a complement of Harpoon missiles to be fired through their torpedo tubes.

Apra Harbor, also called Port Apra, is a deep-water port on the western side of the United States territory of Guam. It is considered one of the best natural ports in the Pacific Ocean. The harbor is bounded by Cabras Island and the Glass Breakwater to the north and the Orote Peninsula in the south. Naval Base Guam and the Port of Guam are the two major users of the harbor. Naval Base Guam is a strategic U.S. naval base located on Apra Harbor and occupying the Orote Peninsula. In 2009, it was combined with Andersen Air Force Base, to form Joint Region Marianas, which is a Navy-controlled joint base.

US Navy Ohio-class Ballistic Missile Submarine USS Nevada (SSBN-733) Visits Guam
The U.S. Navy ballistic-missile submarine USS Nevada (SSBN 733) arrives at Naval Base Guam, January 15. The port visit strengthens cooperation between the United States and allies in the region, demonstrating U.S. capability, flexibility, readiness, and continuing commitment to Indo-Pacific regional security and stability. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Victoria Kinney)
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