Category Archives: Missiles and Bombs

Lockheed Martin awarded $506.9M contract for Patriot Advanced Capability-3 missiles

Lockheed Martin awarded $506.9M contract for Patriot Advanced Capability-3 missiles

The U.S. Army awarded Lockheed Martin a $506.9 million contract to build the Patriot Advanced Capability-3 missiles. the Department of Defense announced Thursday, the contract is for incidental services, hardware, facilities, equipment, as well as all technical, planning, management, manufacturing and testing efforts to produce the Patriot, which is an acronym for the Phased Array Tracking Radar to Intercept on Target. Work will be performed at Lockheed’s plant in Grand Prairie, Texas, with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2024. Army fiscal 2019 other procurement funds in the amount of $506 million were obligated at the time of the award.

Lockheed Martin awarded $506.9M contract for Patriot Advanced Capability-3 missiles

Lockheed Martin awarded $506.9M contract for Patriot Advanced Capability-3 missiles


Patriots defend against incoming threats, including tactical ballistic missiles, cruise missiles and aircraft. The PAC-3 missiles first were deployed during the Iraq conflict in 2003 with 100 percent effectiveness. The PAC-3 significantly increase the Patriot system’s firepower because 16 PAC-3s load-out on a Patriot launcher, compared with four Patriot PAC-2 missiles. The PAC-3 upgrade consists of the PAC-3 missile, a hit-to-kill interceptor, the PAC-3 missile canisters in four packs, a fire solution computer and an Enhanced Launcher Electronics System. The missile system uses a solid propellant rocket motor, aerodynamic controls, attitude control motors and inertial guidance to navigate.
Lockheed Martin awarded $506.9M contract for Patriot Advanced Capability-3 missiles

Lockheed Martin awarded $506.9M contract for Patriot Advanced Capability-3 missiles


Late last month, the Defense Department awarded separate contracts to Lockheed Martin and Raytheon for Patriot missile support for several allied nations. Lockheed was awarded a $680 million deal earlier this month for foreign military sales to South Korea, Poland, Taiwan, United Arab Emirates, Sweden, Saudi Arabia, Romania, Germany and Netherlands. Raytheon also received $102.5 million for parts on domestic and Netherlands Patriot systems on the same day. Lockheed has manufactured more than 2,000 missiles for 13 foreign nations and the United States.

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RAM High Precision Loitering UAV

RAM High Precision Loitering UAV


The RAM UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle ) is a high precision loitering munition developed by Defense & Electronics Technology Company (CDET) LLC, and in partnership with SpetsTechnoExport. The RAM UAV is meant to search and attack air defense batteries and armored targets to be located in the target area on land or at sea. RAM UAV carries up to 3 kg warhead and engage most targets on the battlefield. It has utilized advanced computer vision algorithm to track target based on visual feed from integrated EO camera. It is cost-effective and high power solution for combat missions. The UAV RAM has been tested in real-world combat scenarios as part of the Joint Forces Operation (renamed from Anti-Terrorist Operation as of 1 May 2018) against Russian military aggression in Eastern Ukraine, and showed very high immunity against enemy jamming attempts.

RAM High Precision Loitering UAV

RAM High Precision Loitering UAV


The RAM loitering munition has a maximum take-off weight (MTOW) of 8 kg and measures 1.78 m long and with a 2.3 m wingspan. An electric motor enables it to stay aloft for up to 40 minutes at cruising speeds of up to 70 km/h, although it can reach a maximum speed of 150 km/h when engaging a target with its 3 kg warhead. Propelled by a low acoustic signature electric motor, the RAM UAV can covertly attack by surprise, even from a short distance from the target. Launch is catapult assisted. The drone takes only 10 minutes to go from unpack to launch. It can stay aloft for up to 40 minutes, which is quite enough to get a target detected and destroyed by lethality.
RAM High Precision Loitering UAV

RAM High Precision Loitering UAV


The RAM UAV kamikaze drone is built with extensive use of composite materials, which its designer claims makes it very low-observable to enemy air defenses. The RAM UAV has an integral flight controller capability which supports the functionality that includes autonomous preprogrammed flight, live video streaming, and guiding the munition to a target once it is located. SpetsTechnoExport claims that these munitions can engage targets out to a maximum distance of 30 km with a circular error probable (CEP) under 2 m. SpecTechnoExport is promoting RAM UAV for export. It is cost-effective and high power solution for combat missions.
RAM High Precision Loitering UAV

RAM High Precision Loitering UAV


The munition comes with three options for warhead depending on the types of targets to be attacked:
– thermobaric warhead will be used to defeat enemy personnel sheltered in buildings and fortifications, and to destroy light armored vehicles with crews and infantry passengers;
– High Explosive Anti-Tank (HEAT) warhead will be used against armored targets on land or at sea;
– High Explosive Fragmentation (HEF) warhead will be used against personnel targets encountered in open-area engagements.
RAM High Precision Loitering UAV

RAM High Precision Loitering UAV

Royal Australian Navy MH-60R Romeo

Royal Australian Navy MH-60R Romeo


The Australian Government had approved the acquisition of 24 MH-60R Seahawk ‘Romeo’ naval combat helicopters at a cost of over $3 billion. The new helicopters replace the Royal Australian Navy’s current combat helicopter capability provided by 16 Seahawk S-70B-2 helicopters and will also provide the air to surface strike capability which was to have been provided by the cancelled Seasprite program. Royal Australian Navy have the capacity to provide at least eight warships with a combat helicopter at the same time, including ANZAC Class frigates and the new Air Warfare Destroyers. The remainder will be based at HMAS Albatross in Nowra, New South Wales, and will be in various stages of the regular maintenance and training cycle

Royal Australian Navy MH-60R Romeo

Royal Australian Navy MH-60R Romeo


The MH-60R was originally known as “LAMPS Mark III Block II Upgrade” when development began in 1993 with Lockheed Martin (formerly IBM/Loral). The MH-60R Seahawk (also referred as Romeo) is a further development of the SH-60B Seahawk, which in turn is based on the US Army UH-60 Black Hawk. Designated YSH-60R, they were delivered to NAS Patuxent River in 2001 for flight testing. The production variant was redesignated MH-60R to match its multi-mission capability. The MH-60R was formally deployed by the US Navy in 2006. The MH-60R is designed to combine the features of the SH-60B and SH-60F. The United States Navy has accepted around 100 ‘Romeos’ which have accumulated 90,000 flying hours, including on operational deployments. The first two helicopters will arrive in mid-2014 for testing and evaluation with operations expected to commence in mid-2015.
Royal Australian Navy MH-60R Romeo

Royal Australian Navy MH-60R Romeo


Main missions of the MH-60R Seahawk are Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) and Anti-Surface Warfare (ASuW). This helicopter can detect and track submarines and surface ships and attack with torpedoes and missiles. Secondary missions are search and rescue, combat search and rescue, vertical replenishment, medical evacuation and insertion and extraction of special forces. The MH-60R has two General Electric T700-GE-401C turboshaft engines, developing 1 900 shp each. These are the same engines of the SH-60B. The MH-60R has a hinged tail, that can be folded in order to reduce footprint aboard ships. Cockpit instrumentation and displays are similar to that of the MH-60S. For extended range this helicopter can carry external fuel tanks. The helicopter has an integrated self-defense system.
 Royal Australian Navy MH-60R Romeo

Royal Australian Navy MH-60R Romeo


Its sensors include the ASE package, MTS-FLIR, the AN/APS-147 multi-mode radar/IFF interrogator, an advanced airborne fleet data link, and a more advanced airborne active low frequency sonar (ALFS). Pilot instrumentation is based on a fully integrated glass cockpit, using several digital monitors instead of the complex array of dials and gauges in Bravo and Foxtrot aircraft. Offensive capabilities are improved by the addition of new Mk-54 air-launched torpedoes and Hellfire missiles. A single door-mounted 7.62 mm mm or 12.7 mm machine gun can be fitted. All Helicopter Anti-Submarine Light (HSL) squadrons that receive the Romeo are redesignated Helicopter, Strike Maritime (HSM) squadrons. During a mid-life technology insertion project, the MH-60R fleet shall be fitted with the AN/APS-153 Multi-Mode Radar with Automatic Radar Periscope Detection and Discrimination (ARPDD) capability.
Royal Australian Navy MH-60R Romeo

Royal Australian Navy MH-60R Romeo


French Army LRU Multiple Launch Rocket System

French Army LRU Multiple Launch Rocket System


LRU (Lance Roquette Unitaire – Unitary Launch Rocket) is a European upgrade of M270 involving Germany, Italy and France. In September 2011, a contract for the LRU upgrade was awarded by the French Army Procurement Agency with a Franco-German consortium including Krauss-Maffei Wegmann, alongside Airbus Defence and Space, Sagem, and Thales to modernize the LRM (M270) MLRS (Multiple Launch Rocket System) with new firing system and rockets. LRU is equipped with a new fire control system (EFCS – European Fire Control System) designed par Airbus Defense and Space. The first upgraded LRU was delivered to the French army in February 2014 to the 6th Artillery Regiment, based at Gresswiller for testing, which are now delivered to the 1st Artillery Regiment to be operational.

French Army LRU Multiple Launch Rocket System

French Army LRU Multiple Launch Rocket System


France is upgrading its M270s to fire the 227 mm M31 high explosive (HE) unitary warhead Guided MLRS (GMLRS). This change was required following France’s ratification of the Oslo Convention on Cluster Munitions in December 2008, which banned France’s existing munitions for the M270. French army had a fleet of 55 M270s, only 13 units are receiving the upgrade to the LRU configuration, with the rest having been withdrawn from service. LRU program addresses the need to conduct all-weather precision ground strikes metric, up to 70 km. The acquisition, carried out in cooperation with Germany and Italy, is to turn it into rocket unit of multiple launch rocket systems (MLRS), entered service in the early 90’s.
French Army LRU Multiple Launch Rocket System

French Army LRU Multiple Launch Rocket System


Compared with the earlier French MLRS rockets, which were armed with submunitions, the M31 features a single 90 kg HE warhead; includes GPS and inertial navigation system guidance to provide a circular error of probability of less than 10 m; and doubles the missile’s range to 70 km. EFCS enables firing of M31, M31A1, M32, AT2 and 110 mm rockets, but not of M26, M26A1 and M30, so as to ensure full compliance with the Convention on Cluster Munitions. The LRU uses the new rocket M31 also called GUMLRS (Guided Unitary MLRS). In France, the M31 rocket is manufactured by the U.S. company Lockheed Martin with an engine supplied by the French Company Roxel.
French Army LRU Multiple Launch Rocket System

French Army LRU Multiple Launch Rocket System


The M270 Multiple Launch Rocket System (M270 MLRS) is an armored, self-propelled, multiple rocket launcher; a type of rocket artillery. Since the first M270s were delivered to the U.S. Army in 1983, the MLRS has been adopted by several NATO countries. Some 1,300 M270 systems have been manufactured in the United States and in Europe, along with more than 700,000 rockets. The production of the M270 ended in 2003, when a last batch was delivered to the Egyptian Army. MLRS was developed jointly by the United Kingdom, United States, West Germany, France and Italy, developed from the older General Support Rocket System (GSRS). The M270 MLRS weapons system is collectively known as the M270 MLRS Self-propelled Loader/Launcher (SPLL).
French Army LRU Multiple Launch Rocket System

French Army LRU Multiple Launch Rocket System


Lightweight Multirole Missile (LMM)

Lightweight Multirole Missile (LMM)


The Lightweight Multirole Missile (LMM) is a lightweight air-to-surface and surface-to-surface missile under development by Thales Air Defence for the United Kingdom. LMM is a low cost, lightweight, precision strike, missile, which has been designed to be fired from tactical platforms including fixed or rotary winged UAVs and surface platforms. The system is designed to provide a rapid reaction to a wide range of the surface threats from wheeled or tracked vehicles, towed artillery or static installations; naval threats from small ships and fast inshore attack craft and an air threat from light aircraft. The UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) has placed an initial order for 1,000 missiles and deliveries were due to start in 2013.The missile is known as Martlet in British service. The LMM missile’s propulsion system consists of a two-stage rocket motor. It has a velocity of more than Mach 1.5 and an operational range between 6km and 8km, while the minimum range is 400m.

Lightweight Multirole Missile (LMM)

Lightweight Multirole Missile (LMM)


The missile, sealed in its canister, consists of a two stage motor, warhead and dual mode fuze, together with guidance electronics and a highly
accurate control actuator system. The low cost, covert, flexible LMM missile features soft launch design and has a shelf life of 15 years. It has immediate launch, high lethality, as well as fire on-the-move capabilities. The missile measures 1.3m in length, 0.26m in wing span, and 76mm in diameter. It has a maximum weight of 13kg. It is equipped with a modular shaped charge / pre-fragmented blast warhead, which weighs up to 3kg. The warhead is activated by a highly sensitive laser proximity fuse. The versatile design of the weapon system allows it to be configured to function as an all-in-one weapon system for larger naval platforms and as a hybrid missile / gun system fitted with LMM and integrated with naval guns. It can also be customised for integration on a fast patrol boat.
Lightweight Multirole Missile (LMM)

Lightweight Multirole Missile (LMM)


Guidance for the LMM missile is provided from an optical tracker system attached to the launch platform. The missile can be operated in multiple secure guidance modes including laser beam riding, automatic guidance and laser designation to ensure precision attack of targets with man-in-the-loop. It can also be equipped with IR terminal homing guidance with INS and GPS navigation, as well as semi-active laser guidance. The guidance section is part of an optically stabilised mount, featuring charge-coupled device (CCD) and thermal cameras connected with an automatic target tracker (ATT) and missile laser guidance unit. On target indication, the weapon operator acquiresthe target in the display monitor. The ATT is directed onto the target by the operator and he engages the ATT, which locks a box around the threat. When the target is within range the operator selects ‘System On’ and presses the firing trigger. The missile is launched and guided automatically to the target.
Lightweight Multirole Missile (LMM)

Lightweight Multirole Missile (LMM)


LMM is intended to provide a single family of weapons that can be used in different modes, including:

  • Maritime – LMM will be carried on the new Lynx Wildcat helicopters of the Royal Navy for use against small surface vessels. ASELSAN of Turkey has developed dedicated mounting systems which can also enable the LMM to be launched from naval platforms such as fast attack craft (FAC).
  • Surface-To-Surface – The dual-effect (blast fragmentation and shaped charge) of the LMM’s warhead makes it suitable for use against a wide range of ground targets including light/medium armour.
  • Air-Launched – The missile’s modular design allows for future development and introduction of alternative warheads and seekers.

LMM was initially conceived as Thales’ response to the MoD’s Future Air-to-Surface Guided Weapon (Light) FASGW(L) requirement. The FASGW-L missile system consists of five barrel launchers and a laser guidance system. LMM has been designed to be launched from a variety of naval, air and land platforms against a wide range of targets. In July 2014, Thales unveiled a modification of the LMM that turns it into a glide bomb, called the FreeFall LMM (FFLMM). Thales partnered with Textron to market it as the Fury for the U.S. market, who provides a height-of-burst sensor and electronic safe and arm device.

Lightweight Multirole Missile (LMM)

Lightweight Multirole Missile (LMM)

CAMM FLAADS (Common Anti-Air Modular Missile Future Local Area Air Defence System)

CAMM FLAADS (Common Anti-Air Modular Missile Future Local Area Air Defence System)


The CAMM (Common Anti-Air Modular Missile), is the next generation air surface-to-air missiles designed for land, sea and air environments developed by MBDA for the United Kingdom. CAMM shares some common features and components with the ASRAAM air-to-air missile, but with updated electronics and an active radar homing seeker. The Common Anti-Air Modular Missile is intended to replace the Sea Wolf missile on Type 23 frigates of the Royal Navy from 2017, the Rapier missile in British Army service from 2018 and is contributing to the updating of MBDA’s ASRAAM in service with the Royal Air Force. The UK’s current inservice Rapier ground based air defence system is planned to be replaced by the CAMM based system.

CAMM FLAADS (Common Anti-Air Modular Missile Future Local Area Air Defence System)

CAMM FLAADS (Common Anti-Air Modular Missile Future Local Area Air Defence System)


CAMM has a minimum operational range of less than 1 km and a maximum range greater than 25 km, although some reports that trials have a shown a capability of up to 60 km. These ranges are significantly greater than the 1–10 km range of Sea Wolf and other systems CAMM will replace.[22] CAMM is 99 kilograms (218 lb) in weight, 3.2 metres (10 ft) in length, 166 millimetres (6.5 in) diameter and reaches generous supersonic speeds of Mach 3 (or 1,020 meters per second).CAMM is a point defence and local area defence missile designed to respond to sophisticated missile attacks and has the capability to defend against saturation attacks of supersonic anti-ship cruise missiles, aircraft and other high-performance targets.
CAMM FLAADS (Common Anti-Air Modular Missile Future Local Area Air Defence System)

CAMM FLAADS (Common Anti-Air Modular Missile Future Local Area Air Defence System)


It does this via multiple channels of fire, providing 360-degree simultaneous coverage and high degrees of manoeuvrability. MBDA state that CAMM has a “high rate of fire against multiple simultaneous targets”, providing capabilities comparable to the Aster 15 missile. Design characteristics allow for low cost by modularity and minimising electromechanical complexity through implementing most functionality in software. Additionally, the command and control software reuses over 75% of that developed for the PAAMS system. The soft launch technology provides a true 360° air defence capability and a weapon system that can be easily concealed and quickly deployed without the need for dedicated search radars.
CAMM FLAADS (Common Anti-Air Modular Missile Future Local Area Air Defence System)

CAMM FLAADS (Common Anti-Air Modular Missile Future Local Area Air Defence System)


On the land domain, CAMM is known as Sky Sabre by the British Army. This application has over three-times the range of its predecessor, Rapier and is able to intercept the most challenging targets in all-weather conditions. For international customers in the land domain, MBDA markets the Enhanced Modular Air Defence Solutions (EMADS). This is a rapidly deployable point and area defence system designed to protect mobile and static high value assets. It provides all-weather protection against a spectrum of conventional and challenging air targets, including low level terrain and high altitude threats. Each EMADS launcher is scalable and can carry multiple CAMM or CAMM-ER missiles as well as being highly mobile with excellent off-road capability. The system provides EMADS with pre-launch targeting information based on track data from a suitable radar sensor.
CAMM FLAADS (Common Anti-Air Modular Missile Future Local Area Air Defence System)

CAMM FLAADS (Common Anti-Air Modular Missile Future Local Area Air Defence System)

Rafael unveils SPIKE ER2 anti-tank guided missile

Rafael unveils SPIKE ER2 anti-tank guided missile


Rafael Advanced Defense Systems announces development of a new 5th generation extended range, enhanced stand-off evolution of its 170 mm Spike-ER multipurpose precision-guided missile system, designated Spike ER2. The new ER2 variant enhances the range, agility, and target acquisition capabilities of the Spike-ER, enabling vehicles, boats and, particularly helicopters, to engage targets from longer stand-off ranges utilizing third-party targeting techniques (such as UAVs) previously unavailable for such tactical weapons. The new missile features a number of new capabilities, and a combination of greater standoff range of up to 10 km for surface launch, NLOS engagement capabilities (launch to grid coordinate), 16 km when fired from a helicopter. The company is designating the SPIKE ER2 for the German Tiger Program.

Rafael unveils SPIKE ER2 anti-tank guided missile

Rafael unveils SPIKE ER2 anti-tank guided missile


The SPIKE ER2 includes a new real-time lightweight radio frequency (RF) wireless two-way datalink variant combined with adjustments to the missile’s software to maximize the missile’s energetics/trajectory range for enhanced stand-off launch from rotary platforms, enabling its 16-km range. The 8 km fibre-optic datalink was a limitation in the sense that once the fibre-optic spool was expended, the ER became a fire-and-forget missile. It also contains an advanced seeker with high-resolution IR and day sensors for extended range target acquisition, and a multispectral target tracker, enabling sensory data fusion. In addition, SPIKE ER2 has network connectivity and Non-Line-Of-Sight (NLOS) engagement capabilities, including an embedded IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit) for missions of third-party target allocation, allowing the firing of the missile to NLOS grid target coordinates.
Rafael unveils SPIKE ER2 anti-tank guided missile

Rafael unveils SPIKE ER2 anti-tank guided missile


The new ER2 retains the same weight, airframe, surface geometries, and propulsion unit as the Spike ER, but features a significant range enhancement and other capability augmentations. The built-in compatibility of the SPIKE ER2 to the existing launcher will essentially enable a plug-and-play solution with no risk of integration, at a low cost. The missile’s enhanced lethality consists of a combination of very high precision (regardless of the range) and a very high angle of attack and advanced warheads. Its advanced Tandem HEAT warhead has armor penetration capabilities of all known MBT’s and embedded anti-structure capabilities. A Penetration, Blast, and Fragmentation (PBF) warhead (anti-fortification/anti-ship) option is also available.
Rafael unveils SPIKE ER2 anti-tank guided missile

Rafael unveils SPIKE ER2 anti-tank guided missile


The SPIKE ER2 is part of the SPIKE Missile family, which has evolved into one of the most combat-proven missiles, integrated to more than 45 platforms, in use by 30 nations, with over 30,000 missiles already supplied and 5000 missiles fired. SPIKE ER2 is an upgrade of the 8-km SPIKE ER (Extended Range) missile, which boasts a vast platform portfolio, including the Spanish Army aviation Tiger helicopter, the Colombian Air Force Blackhawk, the Italian AW129 Mangusta, the Romanian Super Puma helicopter, the Super Cobra, and many different types of ground vehicles and naval vessels. The SPIKE ER2 will also be offered to Polish Army as both a surface-to-surface vehicle-mounted standoff precision-guided missile (PGM), as well as rotary PGM for the upgraded MI24 and Sokol helicopters.
Rafael unveils SPIKE ER2 anti-tank guided missile

Rafael unveils SPIKE ER2 anti-tank guided missile