U.S. Air Force Boeing/SAAB T-7 Red Hawk
U.S. Air Force Boeing/SAAB T-7 Red Hawk

Saab Starts Production in Support of U.S. Air Force Boeing T-7 Red Hawk

Saab started assembly production on January 10, 2020 of its section of the Boeing T-7A “Red Hawk” advanced jet trainer developed and produced together with Boeing for the United States Air Force. Boeing is the designated prime contractor for the T-7A advanced pilot training system acquisition by the U.S. Air Force. Saab and Boeing developed the aircraft with Saab as a risk-sharing partner. Saab received the EMD order from Boeing, on September 18, 2018.

Saab is responsible for the development and production of the aft fuselage section for the advanced trainer, with seven aft units being produced in Linköping, Sweden for final assembly at Boeing’s U.S. facility in St. Louis, Missouri. The work is being performed in Linkoping, Sweden, after which future production of Saab’s part for the T-7A will be moved to our new U.S. site in West Lafayette, Indiana. The Saab facility in West Lafayette is an important part of Saab’s growth strategy in the United States, creating strong organic capabilities for the development, manufacturing and sales of its products.

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The Boeing/Saab T-7 Red Hawk, originally known as the Boeing T-X, is an American/Swedish advanced jet trainer developed by Boeing Defense, Space & Security in partnership with Saab Group. On 27 September 2018, Boeing’s design was officially announced as the USAF’s new advanced jet trainer, replacing the T-38 Talon. A total of 351 aircraft and 46 simulators, maintenance training and support are to be supplied at a program cost of US$9.2 billion. On 16 September 2019, the USAF officially named the aircraft the “T-7A Red Hawk” as a tribute to the Tuskegee Airmen, who painted their airplanes’ tails red, and to the Curtiss P-40 Warhawk, one of the aircraft flown by the Tuskegee Airmen.

U.S. Air Force Boeing/SAAB T-7 Red Hawk
U.S. Air Force Boeing/SAAB T-7 Red Hawk
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