Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force Ships Joins US Navy to Operate in the Philippine Sea
Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force Ships Joins US Navy to Operate in the Philippine Sea

Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force Ships Joins US Navy to Operate in the Philippine Sea

The U.S. Navy and Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) concluded several days of at-sea bilateral training in the Philippine Sea, August 18. The training included the U.S. Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), guided-missile cruiser’s USS Antietam (CG 54) and USS Chancellorsville (DDG 62), aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) Five, embarked staffs of Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 15, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) Five and the JMSDF destroyers JS Ohnami (DD 111) and JS Yamagiri (DD 152).

The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) JS Ohnami (DD 111) steams alongside the U.S. Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) in the Philippine Sea, August 16.
The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) JS Ohnami (DD 111) steams alongside the U.S. Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) in the Philippine Sea, August 16. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Eric Stanton)

“Every opportunity we have to integrate with our Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force partners helps to ensure that we’re more than ready to face any challenge in the Western Pacific. Now more than ever, the world needs to see that allies and partners are eager to work together to respond to crisis and are equally committed to the preservation of a free, stable, and secure Indo-Pacific region,” said Capt. Justin Harts, Deputy Commodore, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 15 and embarked Sea Combat Commander.

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The U.S. Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) steams in the Philippine Sea, Aug. 16.
The U.S. Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) steams in the Philippine Sea, August 16. Ronald Reagan provides a combat-ready force that defends the United States and collective maritime interests in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Caleb Dyal)

The U.S.-Japan bilateral operations provided an opportunity for both countries to work together, increase interoperability and focus on common maritime goals. Several Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force personnel visited Ronald Reagan and integrated into strike group operations and watch standing evolutions. Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group, also known as Carrier Strike Group 5 or CSG 5 is the U.S. Navy carrier strike group assigned to the United States Pacific Fleet and permanently forward deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet.

The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) JS Yamagiri (DD 152) sails alongside the U.S. Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) in the Philippine Sea, Aug. 16.
The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) JS Yamagiri (DD 152) sails alongside the U.S. Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) in the Philippine Sea, August 16. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Caleb Dyal)

The Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group is assigned to Commander, Task Force 70 and is on a routine deployment in U.S. 7th Fleet. 7th Fleet is the largest forward-deployed fleet and routinely operates and interacts with 35 maritime nations while conducting missions to preserve and protect critical regional partnerships. It is headquartered at U.S. Fleet Activities Yokosuka, in Yokosuka, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. At present, it is the largest of the forward-deployed U.S. fleets, with 50 to 70 ships, 150 aircraft and 27,000 Sailors and Marines.

Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force Ships Joins US Navy to Operate in the Philippine Sea
The U.S. Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), center, the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) JS Ohnami (DD 111), right, and JS Yamagiri (DD 152) break formation in the Philippine Sea, August 16. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Caleb Dyal)

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