US Navy USS Portland (LPD 27) Tests High Energy Laser Weapon System in Gulf of Aden
US Navy USS Portland (LPD 27) Tests High Energy Laser Weapon System in Gulf of Aden

US Navy USS Portland (LPD 27) Tests High Energy Laser Weapon System in Gulf of Aden

Amphibious transport dock ship USS Portland (LPD 27) conducted a high-energy laser weapon system demonstration, Dec. 14, while sailing in the Gulf of Aden. During the demonstration, the Solid-State Laser – Technology Maturation Laser Weapons System Demonstrator (LWSD) Mark 2 MOD 0 aboard Portland successfully engaged a static surface training target. Portland previously tested the LWSD in May 2020 when it successfully disabled a small unmanned aerial system while operating in the Pacific Ocean.

Amphibious transport dock ship USS Portland (LPD 27) lowers a static surface training target into the Gulf of Aden before conducting a high-energy laser weapon system demonstration, Dec. 14.
Amphibious transport dock ship USS Portland (LPD 27) lowers a static surface training target into the Gulf of Aden before conducting a high-energy laser weapon system demonstration, Dec. 14. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Donald Holbert)

The Office of Naval Research selected Portland to host the laser weapon technology in 2018. The LWSD is considered a next-generation follow-on to the Laser Weapon System (LaWS) that afloat forward staging base USS Ponce (AFSB(I)-15) tested for three years. LWSD’s operational employment on a Pacific Fleet ship is the first system-level implementation of a high-energy class solid-state laser. The laser system was developed by Northrup Grumman, with full System and Ship Integration and Testing led by NSWC Dahlgren and Port Hueneme.

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 Amphibious transport dock USS Portland (LPD 27) transits the Gulf of Aden, Dec. 13, with a Solid State Laser – Technology Maturation Laser Weapons System Demonstrator Mark 2 MOD 0 on board.
Amphibious transport dock USS Portland (LPD 27) transits the Gulf of Aden, Dec. 13, with a Solid State Laser – Technology Maturation Laser Weapons System Demonstrator Mark 2 MOD 0 on board. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Patrick Katz)

The U.S. Navy has been developing directed-energy weapons (DEWs), including lasers, since the 1960s. DEWs are defined as electromagnetic systems capable of converting chemical or electrical energy to radiated energy and focusing it on a target, resulting in physical damage that degrades, neutralizes, defeats, or destroys an adversarial capability. The Navy’s development of DEWs like the LWSD provides immediate warfighter benefits and provides the commander with increased decision space and response options.

 Sailors aboard Amphibious transport dock ship USS Portland (LPD 27) observe a high-energy laser weapon system demonstration on a static surface training target, Dec. 14, while sailing in the Gulf of Aden.
Sailors aboard Amphibious transport dock ship USS Portland (LPD 27) observe a high-energy laser weapon system demonstration on a static surface training target, Dec. 14, while sailing in the Gulf of Aden. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Devin Kates)

Portland is part of the Essex Amphibious Ready Group that includes amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2), dock landing ship USS Pearl Harbor (LSD 52), and embarked Marines from the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit. The units departed San Diego in August and began operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet region in September. U.S. 5th Fleet’s area of operations includes the world’s largest standing maritime partnership, Arabian Gulf, Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Gulf of Oman, and parts of the Indian Ocean.

Amphibious transport dock ship USS Portland (LPD 27) conducts a high-energy laser weapon system demonstration on a static surface training target, Dec. 14, while sailing in the Gulf of Aden.
Amphibious transport dock ship USS Portland (LPD 27) conducts a high-energy laser weapon system demonstration on a static surface training target, Dec. 14, while sailing in the Gulf of Aden.

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