General Electric T64 turboshaft/turboprop engines
General Electric T64 turboshaft/turboprop engines

General Electric Awarded $8 Million Contract for T-64 Engine Support Assembles

General Electric Co., Lynn, Massachusetts, has been awarded a maximum $8,608,777 firm-fixed-price delivery order against a five-year long-term contract for T-64 engine support assembles. This is a 42-month contract with no option periods. Location of performance is Massachusetts, with a Dec. 13, 2024, delivery order end date. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1). This is a 42-month contract with no option periods. Using military service is Navy. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2021 Navy working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The General Electric T64 is a free-turbine turboshaft engine that was originally developed for use on helicopters and fixed-wing aircrafts. General Electric introduced the engine in 1964. The original engine design included technical innovations such as corrosion resistant and high-temperature coatings. The engine features a high overall pressure ratio, yielding a low specific fuel consumption for its time. Although the compressor is all-axial, like the earlier General Electric T58, the power turbine shaft is coaxial with the HP shaft and delivers power to the front of the engine, not rearwards.

General Electric T64 turboshaft/turboprop engines

More recently, an erosion resistant titanium nitride coating has been developed for compressor airfoils, with a time on wing improvement demonstrated of at least 2X. The T64 powers rotary and fixed wing applications ranging from Sikorsky’s H-53E models for Marine Corps and Navy heavy lift helicopters, to short take-off and landing fixed wing transports and a multi-engine amphibious aircraft. The most powerful T64 gives the US Navy’s MH-53E helicopter increased power and OEI capability for its mine sweeping operation.

With more that 3,300 engines produced and 11-million engine flight hours of field experience, the T64 continues to incorporate new technologies that contribute to enhanced performance and availability. These advancements have grown the T64-419 model close to 5,000 shaft horsepower and allow further growth capability to 6,000+ shp, while maintaining current clearance dimensions and critical mount locations. The T64 pioneered a number of technical innovations that have influenced generations of GE engines, such as corrosion resistance and high temperature coatings, front drive free turbines and film cooled turbine nozzles and blades.

Naval Air Systems Command recognized the team for its exceptional efforts in lowering turnaround times for the T64 engine, which powers the CH-53 Super Stallion and MH-53 Sea Dragon, to 298 days from the negotiated turnaround time of 472 days.