U.S. Army testing of the Joint Air-to-Ground Missile (JAGM) via an AH-64 Apache Longbow at Cibola Range, Yuma Proving Ground
U.S. Army testing of the Joint Air-to-Ground Missile (JAGM) via an AH-64 Apache Longbow at Cibola Range, Yuma Proving Ground

Lockheed Martin Awarded $201 Million Contract for Joint Air-to-Ground Missile (JAGM)

Lockheed Martin Corp., Orlando, Florida, was awarded a $201,748,880 modification (P00055) to contract W31P4Q-18-C-0130 for the procurement of Joint Air-to-Ground Missile (JAGM). Work will be performed in Orlando, Florida, with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2023. Fiscal 2010 Foreign Military Sales (United Kingdom) funds; fiscal 2019 and 2020 procurement of ammunition (Army) funds; and 2019 and 2020 procurement (defense-wide) funds in the amount of $201,748,880 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity.

The AGM-179 Joint Air-to-Ground Missile (JAGM) is an American military program to develop an air-to-surface missile to replace the current air-launched BGM-71 TOW, AGM-114 Hellfire, and AGM-65 Maverick missiles. The U.S. Army, Navy, and Marine Corps plan to buy thousands of JAGMs. The Joint Air-to-Ground Missile (JAGM) program is a follow-on from the unsuccessful AGM-169 Joint Common Missile program that was cancelled due to budget cuts. JAGM will share basically the same objectives and technologies as JCM but will be developed over a longer time scale. The designation AGM-179 was assigned to the JAGM program. A Low-Rate Initial Production (LRIP) contract for JAGM was approved in 2018.

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In 2015, the U.S. Army issued an RFP for a JAGM guidance section upgrade. Lockheed Martin was to offer its dual-mode laser and millimeter wave radar seeker, and Raytheon may submit its tri-mode seeker which adds imaging infrared if it chooses to compete.[16] Lockheed Martin was awarded a $66 million engineering and manufacturing contract to combine its laser and millimeter wave seekers into the Hellfire Romeo missile body. Raytheon chose not to compete but retains its tri-mode seeker should the Army request it. In June 2007 the US Defense Department released a draft request for proposals (RFP) launching a competition for the Joint Air to Ground Missile (JAGM) program.

U.S. Army testing of the Joint Air-to-Ground Missile (JAGM) via an AH-64 Apache Longbow at Cibola Range, Yuma Proving Ground
U.S. Army testing of the Joint Air-to-Ground Missile (JAGM) via an AH-64 Apache Longbow at Cibola Range, Yuma Proving Ground
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