General Dynamics Awarded 428 Million U.S. Army Contract for Stryker Technical Support Services
General Dynamics Awarded 428 Million U.S. Army Contract for Stryker Technical Support Services

General Dynamics Awarded 428 Million U.S. Army Contract for Stryker Technical Support Services

General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS), Sterling Heights, Michigan, was awarded a $428,229,970 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for the field level maintenance, field service representative support, contingency maintenance support, new equipment training and total package fielding for the family of Stryker vehicles. Bids were solicited via the internet with two received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of July 31, 2025. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Detroit Arsenal, Michigan, is the contracting activity (W56HZV-20-D-0075).

A M1128 MGS Stryker, assigned to the 4th Squadron, 3rd Cavalry Regiment, provides security during Decisive Action Rotation 20-02 at the National Training Center on Fort Irwin, Calif.
A M1128 MGS Stryker, assigned to the 4th Squadron, 3rd Cavalry Regiment, provides security during Decisive Action Rotation 20-02 at the National Training Center on Fort Irwin, Calif. (U.S. Army Photo by SSG Matthew Johnson, Operations Group, National Training Center)

The U.S. Army continues to modernize its Stryker fleet of vehicles through the introduction of the 30mm, up gunned Infantry Carrier Vehicle – Dragoon (ICVD), and the Double-V Hull A1 platform. Seven Stryker versions are being produced in this configuration; the M1256 ICVV, M1252 MCVV, M1255 CVV, M1251 FSVV, M1257 ESVV, M1254 MEVV and M1253 ATVV. The Stryker A1 eight-wheeled vehicle is built to vastly increase power, survivability and mobility, while providing extra stowage and seating for nine Soldiers, plus a 3-Soldier crew. The Stryker fleet is considered the backbone of the Army, with nearly 4,700 vehicles fielded.

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Staff Sgt. Shawn Mercer, a cavalry scout assigned to Alpha Troop, 4th Squadron, 10th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, guides a Stryker onto a railcar at Fort Carson, Colorado,
Staff Sgt. Shawn Mercer, a cavalry scout assigned to Alpha Troop, 4th Squadron, 10th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, guides a Stryker onto a railcar at Fort Carson, Colorado. (U.S. Army photo by Capt. Daniel Parker)

The ICV (Infantry Carrier Vehicle) Stryker is a family of eight-wheeled armored fighting vehicles derived from the Canadian LAV III. Stryker vehicles are produced by General Dynamics Land Systems for the United States Army. It has 4-wheel drive (8×4) and can be switched to all-wheel drive (8×8). The Stryker family of vehicles fills a role in the United States Army that is neither heavy nor light, but rather an attempt to create a force that can move infantry to the battlefield quickly and in relative security. Stryker units seem to be especially effective in urban areas, where vehicles can establish initial security positions near a building and dismount squads on a doorstep.

U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to 3rd Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment drive Stryker infantry carrier vehicles during Bull Run 12 near Jaglowo, Poland.
U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to 3rd Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment drive Stryker infantry carrier vehicles during Bull Run 12 near Jaglowo, Poland, June 19, 2020. (U.S. Army photo by Cpl. Justin W. Stafford)

The vehicle comes in several variants with a common engine, transmission, hydraulics, wheels, tires, differentials and transfer case. The M1130 Command Vehicle and M1133 Medical Evacuation Vehicle have an air conditioning unit mounted on the back. The medical vehicle also has a higher-capacity generator. A recent upgrade program provided a field retrofit kit to add air conditioning units to all variants, and production started in 2005 on the Mobile Gun System mounting an overhead General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS) 105 mm automatic gun called the M1128 Mobile Gun System. The Stryker is based on the LAV III light armored vehicle, which in turn was based on the LAV-25 series.

A U.S. Army Soldier, assigned to 3rd Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment, looks out from a Stryker Infantry Carrier Vehicle during a wet gap crossing rehearsal for Bull Run 12 in Jaglowo, Poland, June 19, 2020.
A U.S. Army Soldier, assigned to 3rd Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment, looks out from a Stryker Infantry Carrier Vehicle during a wet gap crossing rehearsal for Bull Run 12 in Jaglowo, Poland, June 19, 2020. (U.S. Army photo by Cpl. Justin W. Stafford)
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