Sherpa Light by Arquus

Sherpa Light by Arquus

Sherpa Light by Arquus


The Sherpa Light family of 4×4 tactical and light armoured vehicles is designed to provide light forces (infantry, paratroopers, marines, internal security…) with the best mobility / payload compromise of its category. The Sherpa Light manufactured by the French Defense Company Arquus (Renault Trucks Defense). In addition to its outstanding on and off-road performances, the Sherpa Light is fully air transportable (A400M / C-130), multirole and ready for being up-armoured (ballistic and mine kits). The Sherpa Light has already been adopted by NATO, France and other countries. Its vehicles are available to North American customers via Mack Defense under license.
Sherpa Light by Arquus

Sherpa Light by Arquus


The Sherpa Light Station Wagon (SW) is fully armoured and ideally suited for various tactical missions such as protected patrol and internal security. It is able to transport up to 6 soldiers and/or any weapon or mission system. The Sherpa Light High Intensity (HI) is ideally suited for combat missions demanding a high level of protection such as offensive scouting, counterinsurgency tasks, and convoy escort. It is able to transport up to 4 or 5 soldiers and a remotely operated weapon system.
Sherpa Light by Arquus

Sherpa Light by Arquus


Renault Trucks Defense, an armoured vehicle subsidiary of Volvo Group, was renamed Arquus on 24 May, as part of the launch of a new strategy for the business. Renault Trucks Defence, which produces wheeled armoured vehicles and is also responsible for the Panhard and Acmat brands, had been targeted for divestment from Volvo for close to a year, until efforts to find a buyer were dropped in October 2017. The company’s rebranding and new strategic plan come just months after the company failed in its bid to win a contract for France’s Véhicule Blindé Multi-Rôle Léger (Light Multirole Armoured Vehicle, VBMR-L), a replacement for the Véhicule de l’Avant Blindé (Forward Area Armoured Vehicle) platforms it supplied to the French Army from the 1970s onwards.

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