Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 11 ‘Dragon Slayers’ – Live Fire Exercise


Sailors assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 11, the “Dragon Slayers,” embarked on USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), conduct a live fire exercise on an MH-60S Seahawk helicopter.
Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 11 (HSC-11), also known as the Dragon Slayers, is a United States Navy helicopter squadron based at Naval Air Station Norfolk as part of Carrier Air Wing 1 operating MH-60S helicopters deployed aboard aircraft carriers. The squadron was established on 27 June 1957 at Naval Air Station Quonset Point as Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 11 (HS-11) with Sikorsky HSS-1 Seabat helicopters.
In 1994, HS-11 transitioned to the Sikorsky SH-60F and HH-60H Seahawk helicopters. The capabilities of those aircraft allowed the squadron to greatly expand its mission areas. In addition to ASW and search and rescue, the Dragonslayers added such missions as Vertical Replenishment, Naval Special Warfare Support, and Combat Search and Rescue to its capabilities. With the addition of the Hellfire missile system and GAU-16 .50 caliber machine gun in 1999, HS-11 became capable of effectively conducting anti-surface warfare. In 2014 HS-11 became the first active duty fleet helicopter squadron to deploy with the GAU-17/A 7.62mm mini-gun system.
On 1 June 2016, HS-11 completed transition to the MH-60S Seahawk, was redesignated HSC-11,[2] and moved from NAS Jacksonville to Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia.
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Credit: LCDR Laura Stegherr, PO2 Scott Swofford | AiirSource Military Channel

Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 11 'Dragon Slayers' – Live Fire Exercise

Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 11 ‘Dragon Slayers’ – Live Fire Exercise

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